Environment

Watch condor babies grow up via new cave live stream

Watch condor babies grow up via new cave live stream

It is difficult to see the California condor in its natural environments. Now, one can observe condor chicks growing up via new cave live streaming. The California condor is a rare breed. It is the largest bird in North America and its wingspan is nine-and-a-half feet.

As per reports, a web cam from the US Fish and Wildlife Service helps do so. The webcam helps biologists and inquisitive viewers observe the birds, while they interact with their parents and finally leave the nest. The web cam has been set up in a rocky cliffside cavity in Ventura County in Southern California.

Ocean levels climbed by 3 inches on average since 1992

Ocean levels climbed by 3 inches on average since 1992

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and its partners studied some satellite measurements and found that seas around the globe have risen about three inches on average for the last 23 years. They found that in some areas, ocean levels have climbed over nine inches.

According to scientists at the United States space agency, the global seas will continue to rise as warming temperatures are continuously melting ice sheets of Antarctica and Greenland. The satellite measurements warned that if world’s temperatures continue to rise, ocean levels will rise by about three feet by the end of the century.

Global Warming is an Imminent Threat: Study

Global Warming is an Imminent Threat: Study

A new Climate Council report has warned that if we want to stay hopeful to control climate change, fossil fuels must be left in the ground and the world must also be decarbonized completely in coming 30-35 years.

The warning has been given on the basis of findings according to which, the case behind 2°C as a 'safe' level of global warming is weakening at a very fast pace. The report named 'Growing Risks, Critical Choices' released on Tuesday, August 26.

Scientists said that in comparison to 2011, when the Climate Council's Critical Decade report was published, the risks of climate change seems to be much serious now, even at lower levels of warming.

Two bald eagles to return back to wild from Wildlife Center of Virginia this week

Two bald eagles to return back to wild from Wildlife Center of Virginia

This week, the Wildlife Center of Virginia (WCV) is going to release two bald eagles. The center has planned to release one eagle on Wednesday morning at Widewater State Park in Stafford County and the other on Thursday at 3:00 p.m. at the Chippokes Plantation State Park in Surry County.

People can see the releases that too free of cost. The information related to the release is available. Anybody interested in attending it can RSVP to WCV by sending an email to lkegley@wildlifecenter.org.

Experts to discuss Water, Energy in World Water Week

Experts to discuss Water, Energy in World Water Week

To show concern towards earth’s water, world has decided to shift its focus to it. This week, a number of experts from different places of the world will gather inStockholm for World Water Week. During the event, the experts will discuss how to find an appropriate way to save water by using renewable energy.

A number of countries around the world are currently experiencingeffects of water shortage. The United States state of California is dealing with four-year-long severe drought.California is not the only place experiencing water shortage as countries like Brazil and South Africa are dealing with the same problem as well as electricityshortage.

Salamander preserved in Amber provides Clues to Scientists of what was Life on Caribbean Islands over 20 Million Years back

Salamander preserved in Amber provides Clues to Scientists of what was Life

A small salamander has been discovered preserved in amber. It is from a now extinct species and also confirms that salamander once lived in the Caribbean where now no salamander is found. The salamander provides a great look about how life was on the Caribbean Islands over 20 million years ago.

Study researchers said found baby salamander had a bad day, as its leg was bitten off by a predator and then it fell into a gooey resin container and got preserved forever. George Poinar, Jr., a professor emeritus in the OSU College of Science, said that he was quite surprised to find the salamander in amber.

Obama imposes deepest CO2 cuts on some states

Obama imposes deepest CO2 cuts on some states

President Obama says that it is needed to work together to deal with climate change. However, his plans for tackling the condition are taken differently by different states. It seems that some states have different targets compared to others.

Obama said in one of his addresses related to global warming, “Americans across the country are already paying the price of inaction.And reducing carbon dioxide emissions is "exactly the kind of challenge that's big enough to remind us that we're all in this together".

Even then, "clean power plan" of the president relieves some of the states, whereas some others have been focused other way for the reason that they have been imposed with more cuts. As per reports, three states, Hawaii, Vermont, and Alaska have been exempted.

Justice Department Lawyer urges Appeals Court To Defend Plan on Polar Bear Habitat

Justice Department Lawyer urges Appeals Court To Defend Plan on Polar Bear Habit

On Tuesday, alawyer of the Justice Department told an appeals court to uphold a United States Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS)plan which has been allocating swath of the Arctic region in the United States as habit for polar bear. The lawyer told the appeals court that the plan shouldbe defended over the objections of Alaska, a number of communities along the state’s north coast and some petroleum industry groups.

The lawyer,Robert Stockman, said that the federal plan which has been designating a huge area in the United States Arctic lacked specifics. According to Stockman, theagency of federal government within the United States Department of the Interior acted on the data provided some experts of polar bear.

San Jose's Guadalupe River to disappear due to California drought

San Jose's Guadalupe River to disappear due to California drought

A river no longer runs through downtown San Jose. The Mercury News has reported that the Guadalupe River does not exist anymore. Fish and wildlife are also missing or dead there.

This is so heartbreaking, said Leslee Hamilton, executive director of the Guadalupe River Park Conservancy, a nonprofit that runs educational and community programs along the bank of the river. The timing is really bad as a great surge was seen in the number of birds and wildlife in the area, added Hamilton.

Gordon Becker, a fisheries scientist with the Center for Ecosystem Management and Restoration, says that dryness is continuously increasing in every stream. Guadalupe River in San Jose stretches 14 miles long, but California drought has caused eight miles of the once flowing river to go bone-dry.

Drought-Sensitive Butterfly Population under High Risk of Extinction

Drought-Sensitive Butterfly Population under High Risk of Extinction

It is known that climate change has been causing harmful affect on flora and fauna across the world. Recently researchers in a new study have found that butterfly population in Britain could be the next to be affected due to climate change if conservationists didn’t take necessary steps.

Study researcher who presented their findings in the journal Nature Climate Change suggested that widespread drought-sensitive butterfly population extinctions could occur as early as 2050.

The study found that as earth is getting warmer, these drought-sensitive butterflies are more likely to go extinct. According to NASA, the average global temperature on Earth has increased by 0.8 degrees Celsius (1.4 degrees Fahrenheit) since 1880. Two-thirds of the warming has occurred since 1975.

Air pollution across Pacific from China affecting US

Air pollution across Pacific from China affecting US

According to a new study, as a result of pollution across the Pacific from China, reduction in unhealthy ozone in the western United States has been largely affected. On Monday, the study was published in the Nature Geoscience.

Scientists have assumed since long that this could explain the reason behind constant ozone levels along west coast of the US in the face of an important local decrease in chemicals that lead to formation of ozone.

As per authors, it is the first study to come up with such findings by making use of satellite observations in addition to computer models. It tells about movement of airborne molecules in the lower atmosphere.

Guadalupe River Has Dried

Guadalupe River Has Dried

The San Jose Mercury News has reported that the Guadalupe River, which runs through San Jose, has dried up despite several years of restoration efforts made by authorities. Now fish and other wildlife that made the waterway their home are missing or dead, they said.

The large section of the river that passed through America’s 10th largest city since past two months has miles of cracked, arid gray riverbed, and the marine ecosystem has been completely devastated.

Leslee Hamilton, executive director of the Guadalupe River Park Conservancy, a nonprofit that runs educational and community programs along the river, said in a statement that not only the authorities but the city residents are also heartbroken after seeing condition of the river.

Million Gallons of Mustard-Hued Wastewater Spilled Into a Colorado River

Million Gallons of Mustard-Hued Wastewater Spilled Into a Colorado River

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on Thursday said that they accidently spilled about a million gallons of mustard-hued wastewater containing heavy metals into a Colorado River while they were investigating a leak at a mine.

Officials said in a statement that the spill contains contained cadmium, aluminum, copper and calcium, in addition to lead and arsenic. So far officials are not aware about the concentrations of these heavy metals.

Joan Card, an adviser to Environmental Protection Agency Regional Director Shaun McGrath stated that no health hazard has been detected so far, but the test will continue.

The wastewater flowed down Cement Creek and into the scenic Animas River, which is popular with boaters and anglers, said Federal officials.

Authorities Trying to Coax Bottlenose Dolphin to return to its Natural Habitat

Authorities Trying to Coax Bottlenose Dolphin to return to its Natural Habitat

A bottlenose dolphin has made South River its home for the past week. The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection officials have been trying to guide the dolphin to go back to the ocean. It has not been causing any problem or is not under stress, but the officials want it to comfortably return to its natural habitat.

The officials said that the dolphin could be seen jumping in and out of water in the South River. Since Wednesday afternoon, the bottlenose dolphin has been gaining attracting in Old Bridge, New Jersey. For the first time, it was caught on a video made by David Herrick, a local.

Officials taking Steps to Prevent Spread of Emerald ash borer

Officials taking Steps to Prevent Spread of Emerald ash borer

Emerald ash borer continues to prove problematic across the Rock River Valley. Since 2006, the beetle has plagued Illinois and the Loves Park area since July 2011. In the coming weeks, Loves Park will start removing 40 to 50 ash trees that have been affected by the emerald ash borer.

The tree removal task is big one this time, therefore, the officials have hired a private contractor to handle the ash elimination. Mayor Darryl Lindberg said that the destruction level is more than they can handle.

The problem is quite big in the Rock River Valley. Last year, Rockford officials removed around 2,300 trees around town. Over the next two years, the city plans to remove an additional 3,400 trees- half this year and the remaining the next year.

Toxic Algal Bloom spreads across Waters of Alaska, British Columbia and California

Toxic Algal Bloom spreads across Waters of Alaska, British Columbia

Officials have recently said that a massive toxic algal bloom along the West Coast of United States and Canada appears to be the largest ever seen. The algal bloom has now spread to coastal waters of Alaska, British Columbia and all the way to California.

As per authorities this large toxic algal bloom has resulted in shutdown of economically vital fisheries up and down the West Coast. The bloom has erupted within an area of the northeast Pacific Ocean. It is said that the area has persistently seen an above average sea surface temperatures for more than past two years.

2nd Wolf enters Northern California in almost 100 days

2nd Wolf enters Northern California in almost 100 days

A second wild wolf in almost 100 days has made its way to California. Wildlife workers have properly assessed the tracks and think that it is a gray wolf. Officials from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) have said that it is a wolf based on trail cameras and study of tracks.

Officials said people reported them about sightings of a lone wolf earlier this year. They installed remote trail cameras in southeastern Siskiyou County to know about the matter. In May, they had pictures of a ‘large, dark-colored, lone canid’, but were not able to confirm that whether it was wolf or not.

Russia Submits Claim for 1.2 Million Sq Km in Arctic Ocean to UN

Russia Submits Claim for 1.2 Million Sq Km in Arctic Ocean to UN

Russia has claimed its stake for the Arctic Ocean including the North Pole, saying that the disputed region is part of the country’s ‘continental character’. The nation has submitted their claim for 1.2 million sq km of disputed territory to the United Nations.

It is said the area in question is thought to contain large untapped reserves of oil and gas. Some also believe that the area is a huge reserve for gems and minerals such as gold and nickel.

Russian officials said, “The tectonic plate maps clearly showed that the outer borders of the continental shelf in the Arctic Ocean is based on the scientific understanding that the central Arctic underwater ridges … have a continental character”.

Scientists Find Answer to What Helps Earthworms Digest Fallen Leaves

Scientists Find Answer to What Helps Earthworms Digest Fallen Leaves

Earthworms, small crawling creature, also bring a lot of benefits to the lands they crawl. They are known for their ability to enrich soils. What makes the long earthworms so good at enriching soils has remained unknown since long? But recently a team of researchers claims that they have finally found an answer to it.

The researchers stated that the fallen leaves that are eaten up by the earthworms contain toxic chemicals which can be harmful for other animals who consume it. But these crawling creatures easily munch these leaves and add great benefits to soils.

Faster fish may be evolving to escape capture by fishing nets

Faster fish may be evolving to escape capture by fishing nets

According to a new study, fish might be evolving to swim more rapidly to get away from capture by fishing nets from trawlers. The study has been conducted by the University of Glasgow. It shows that fast-swimming fish are difficult to trap by fishing nets and in the long run this could bring physiological changes in fish populations.

The researchers made efforts to find out whether a few individual fish were more susceptible to be captured over and over again. They measured the metabolic rate, swimming ability and indicators of aerobic and anaerobic physical fitness of a number of fish.




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