Non-invasive Diagnostic Tool can ‘Smell’ Prostate Cancer in Men’s Urine

Non-invasive Diagnostic Tool can ‘Smell’ Prostate Cancer in Men’s Urine

Last year, about 28,000 men in United States died of prostate cancer, and still there is no effective, non-invasive test to diagnose the disease. Now, British researchers have come up with a non-invasive diagnostic tool that can ‘smell’ prostate cancer in the urine of men.

According to the National Cancer Institute, the test could offer hope for African-American men or the ones having a family history of prostate cancer. The two groups are thought to be more vulnerable to the disease.

Study links Poor Fitness in Middle Age to Smaller Brains 20 Years Later

Study links Poor Fitness in Middle Age to Smaller Brains 20 Years Later

A latest study has linked poor fitness during middle age to smaller brains nearly 20 years later. The study findings suggested that health and lifestyle choices can have a huge impact many years later by essentially shrinking the brains of ‘couch potatoes’.

Published online in the journal Neurology, the study included 1,094 participants. The average age of the participants was around 40, and at the start of the study, they were not suffering from heart disease, strokes, or dementia. They weren’t even consuming meds, known as beta blockers for lowering their blood pressure.

Neanderthal DNA might help shape our health

Neanderthal DNA might help shape our health

Some years back, scientists discovered stretches of Neanderthal DNA in living humans, and now they have found proof, described in a study appeared on Thursday in Science, that some of that DNA could help shape our health.

In case you bring out a comparison between Neanderthal skeleton and a modern human skeleton, the Neanderthal appears stocky, barrel-chested, and quite brutish. They were genetically different, however, nonetheless, to modern humans’ closest relative, Homo sapiens. They used to live in Europe and western Asia, whereas modern humans initially roamed in Africa.

Thereafter, nearly 60,000 years back, some of the modern humans become restless and moved to Eurasia. There they met the Neanderthals, and apparently some liked what they witnessed, thus had kids.

Zika-linked complications take three lives in Venezuela Citizens

Zika-linked complications take three lives in Venezuela Citizens

On Thursday, Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro said that three people have lost their lives due to complications associated with the mosquito-borne Zika virus. Maduro said that Zika’s suspected cases had risen to 5,221.

Brazil said on Thursday that three people who lost their lives previous year suffered from Zika virus, though authorities don’t have any evidence that Zika solely was behind their deaths.

Just one in five people suffering from Zika experience illness and even then they are usually mild symptoms. Scientists so far haven’t succeeded in fully understanding the virus and so far there is no proof showing that it causes the birth deformations or any death reports.

Conservative Health Secretary to impose inferior contract on England’s 55,000 junior doctors

Conservative Health Secretary to impose inferior contract on England’s 55,000

In an announcement yesterday, Conservative Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt said he would impose an inferior contract on 55,000 junior doctors in England after it failed in reaching an agreement with the British Medical Association (BMA).

Addressing Parliament, Hunt said that the negotiator of the government Sir David Dalton had reached to an agreement on 90% of issues with the BMA, but so far no contract agreement had been finalized by a deadline of the earlier evening.

Study claims Dementia is on the Decline

Study claims Dementia is on the Decline

A new study has suggested that risk of dementia has been declining dramatically, but scientists don’t know reason behind the decline. Since the late 1970s, the chronic disorder of cognitive abilities is on the decline, as per the study featured in the New England Journal of Medicine.

For the last more than four decades, the risk of developing dementia has declined with a rate of 20% every decade. The study has released its results at a time when it was predicted that cases of dementia, also known senility, will loom in future.

Tennessee Hospital under Fire after Performing Surgery on Wrong Infant

Tennessee Hospital under Fire after Performing Surgery on Wrong Infant

Nothing is horrifying for a surgeon than performing a wrong surgery on a patient, but Tennessee hospital doctors committed the mistake during a major surgery. A local mother alleged that the doctors performed a surgery on her newborn that was actually meant for another baby.

According to Jennifer Melton, mother of little Nate, she thought the team of doctors was taking her baby for a typical exam, but just a few hours after Nate took birth, they performed a tongue clipping procedure, Frenulectomy, on him. The surgery was meant for another infant, said Melton. Now, the mother has planned to sue the hospital for the wrongful procedure.

Frenulectomy is a procedure which involves clipping a flap of skin that links a person’s tongue and mouth to allow freer range of motion.

A Likely Solution to Mystery behind Crack Formation in Michigan Found

A Likely Solution to Mystery behind Crack Formation in Michigan Found

The mystery behind what caused a unique crack in the ground of Menominee, Michigan, five years ago in October 2010 has been cracked. Faculty and student researchers from Michigan Technological University, on studying the area for long, concluded that the pop-up occurred due to release of underground pressure on the limestone rock in the area.

The residents of the area experienced around 15 seconds of unusual movements, they thought that it was an earthquake, but scientists believed that it wasn’t an earthquake as it didn't register on a seismograph. Rather the movement was caused by something else.

Scientists Wary of Food to be sent along Astronauts for Mission to Mars

Scientists Wary of Food to be sent along Astronauts for Mission to Mars

NASA is all set to launch its first manned mission to Mars soon in near future, but still NASA finds the need to do more research into what astronauts should eat in order to survive their long trip to Mars that will take approximately three years.

Frozen Rabbit Brain Thawed out Perfectly boosts Prospect of Reanimating Human Brain

Frozen Rabbit Brain Thawed out Perfectly boosts Prospect of Reanimating Human

In a miracle discovery, 21st Century Medicine (21CM) researchers have announced that they have tasted success in recovering an entire mammalian brain from cryopreservation. The discovery announced Tuesday has given hopes that one day, human brain will also be brought back to life.

It has been for the first time when a mammal brain was frozen and thawed out perfectly. For the incredible scientific achievement, the Brain Preservation Foundation honored the 21CM team with the Small Mammal Brain Preservation Prize.

Florida DEP, FWC issue orders allowing Feds to move more water through Shark River Slough in Everglades

Florida DEP, FWC issue orders allowing Feds to move more water through Shark

Late Thursday afternoon, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) issued orders that as per Gov. Rick Scott would permit feds to move more water via Shark River Slough in the Everglades, instead of the coasts.

On Thursday evening Corps officials couldn't be reached to see whether they will release more water south. Previously in the day, the Corps said that it would carry on releases east and west, but may not move water south as the land is already quite wet.

During a Thursday news conference, the Corps talked about water levels at Lake Okeechobee and how such levels are going to impact the Fort Myers-Sanibel region and at St. Lucie on the east coast.

Bird counts some of oldest and best examples of citizen science

Bird counts some of oldest and best examples of citizen science

Worldwide bird watchers could hope to spend Valentine's Day weekend along with the birds, making a contribution to the Great Backyard Bird Count.

Citizen science movements are growing across the globe, as communities have been developing their amateur interest in galaxies, frogs or in birds in this case for providing data that can't be uncovered by any single scholar or even study research team.

In a phone interview, Pat Leonard of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, who coordinates the 2016 Great Backyard Bird Count, said that's the sole way to keep track of things that are very widespread. It all became possible because of the Internet.

Swiss researchers develop rescue drone that can autonomously recognize and follow forest passageways

Swiss researchers develop rescue drone that can autonomously recognize

Swiss researchers have come up with a rescue drone which can autonomously identify and follow passageways via the undergrowth and rough terrain, with the help of sophisticated artificial intelligence.

The ultimate envision of the scientists is an entire fleet of the rescue drones that can swarm forests seeking missing people, functioning along with their human counterparts.

NASA looking well beyond earth's orbit in a new art series

NASA looking well beyond earth's orbit in a new art series

In a latest art series, NASA is looking quite beyond the earth’s orbit. Invisible Creature-designed travel posters have taken a futuristic look at the incredible potential of space tourism.

In a statement that went along with the calendar that features these designs, Charles Elachi, director of NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab, said, “Imagination is our window into the future. As you mark the passing of this year with these imaginative destinations, remember that you are the architects of the future. What we make and do will have a profound significance for generations to come”. The designers’ website has made the posters available for sale individually.

65-year-old bird hatches chick at Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge in Pacific Ocean

65-year-old bird hatches chick at Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge in Pacif

For a Laysan albatross named Wisdom, age is nothing more than just a number. At the Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge in the Pacific Ocean, the 65-year-old bird has hatched a chick which is at least her sixth one since 2006.

Four years ago, no bird was known to have attained the same maternal feats when scientists initially began squawking loudly regarding Wisdom. The life of an average Laysan albatross comes to an end at less than half her age. Scientists used to think that albatross females, alike other birds, becomes infertile late in life, leading a life without producing chicks.

Scientists develop polymer capable of holding 1,000 Times Its Own Mass

Scientists develop polymer capable of holding 1,000 Times Its Own Mass

What about a material that is capable of supporting mass 1,000 times more than its own mass? And what more, it would bend or change shape with the mere warmth from a human hand. Researchers from the University of Rochester have developed this new polymer which, they claim, has traits that could make it "uniquely useful" in a wide range of fields, including medical science.

The findings of this study have been published in the Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics.

Gravitational Waves: Revolutionary Discovery proves Einstein’s Ripples in Spacetime Exist

Gravitational Waves: Revolutionary Discovery proves Einstein’s Ripples in Spacet

Decades after the departure of genius theoretical physicist Albert Einstein, scientists said he was right about gravitational waves. Physicists surprised science community on Thursday by announcing that they have successfully detected the ripples in spacetime that Einstein first predicted a century ago.

Gravitational waves have been a trending topic in science community since the German-born mentioned them in his theory of general relativity, but they became talk of the town last year when it was rumored that a team of astrophysicists has detected the waves. The astrophysicist team used the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) and discovered a gravitational wave that it believed was generated due to a collision between two black holes far from earth.

More price hikes for tobacco could cause serious unwanted and unhealthy side effects

More price hikes for tobacco could cause serious unwanted and unhealthy side

The past years of tobacco prize hikes had its positive effects on cutting the amount of smokers, which is happy to hear about. There is nothing wrong in the intentions of people who are seeking more prize hikes, for making New Zealand smokefree by 2025. However, to think of New Zealand as smokefree in 2025 is no less than a huge illusion.

Drugs will be used as long as there will be humans, and for the last couple of hundred years, tobacco has been among those drugs. It is sad that more tobacco price hikes could cause some serious unnecessary and unhealthy side effects.

‘Illegalization’ of tobacco has been tried but, prohibition or exorbitant price hikes have always resulted into illegal markets. Sale of illegal tobacco is practiced on the black market in New Zealand.

House Representatives Not Happy with Barack Obama’s Attempt to cut Great Lakes budget

House Representatives Not Happy with Barack Obama’s Attempt to cut Great Lakes

Yet another attempt by US President Barack Obama to improve the federal deficit by slashing the budget for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI) has met with resistance from the House representatives.

On Tuesday, the US President tried to cut the budget for the GLRI by $50 million (from $300 million to $250 million) even as House representatives demanded that money be allowed to flow for the project. This was probably President Obama’s last bid before his tenure ends, in a series of several such attempts over the past two years.

Harvard Research team working on long term Diabetes treatment

Harvard Research team working on long term Diabetes treatment

The long struggle to survive fight against diabetes is likely to come to an end when an invention of an artificial pancreas will become reality. The Harvard University researchers are trying to introduce automating diabetic care through artificial pancreas.

The team of researchers has been working on the project for more than two decades. Frank Doyle, Dean of the Harvard School of Engineering & Applied Sciences, predicts that the researchers’ attempt to make a fully functional automated system for diabetes would get success in about five years. Earlier, experiment on mice has already proved successful.

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