Health News

Blood test analyzes DNA markers to detect breast cancer relapse

Blood test to detect breast cancer relapse

A ‘revolutionary’ blood test developed in London can detect breast cancer relapses around eight months prior to when they strike. The ‘minute amounts of cancer DNA’ in breast cancer survivors can be detected by this personalized blood test to predict if the disease will make a comeback.

Scientists at the Institute of Cancer Research have created this new amazing test. The test finds very small numbers of the cancer cells that endured chemotherapy and stay in the bloodstream of a woman.

The scientists detected the cancer DNA by creating personal tests based on the specific mutations in each patient's cancer. The test may provide good results, but it is not expected to be available for some years.

Water could be key to lose weight

Water could be key to lose weight

Researchers from the University of Birmingham have good news for obese people, as they have found the trick to lose weight in water. Drinking 16.9 ounces of water before every meal can help people shed weight.

The researchers said people who drink water before every meal- breakfast, lunch and dinner are able to lose weight faster than those who do not follow this routine. In the study, the researchers recruited 84 adults and they had to follow a 12-wek program.

All participants have received advice on weight loss like adapting their lifestyles, improving their diets and performing regular exercise. After the advice, the total number was divided into two sub-groups.

Women having High BP during Pregnancy more likely to develop it again later in life

Women having High BP during Pregnancy more likely to develop it again later

If women having high blood pressure during their pregnancy then there is a probability that they will have this health issue later in life as well. The study has also found that brothers and sisters of these women also have a higher risk and brothers may also have a high risk of heart disease as well.

Study's co-leader Tracey Weissgerber, of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, was of the view, "The increased risk of high blood pressure in siblings suggests that family history contributes to the increased risk of high blood pressure in women during pregnancy".

Tracey said that in comparison to women who did not have blood pressure during their pregnancy, women who had high blood pressure in pregnancy were having more chances to develop in it again later in life.

Mystery Solved: Famous Polar Bear Knut died of encephalitis

Mystery Solved: Famous Polar Bear Knut died of encephalitis

Polar bears enjoy long life; they can live up to 20 years. But the sudden death of four-year-old famous Berlin Zoo polar bear, Knut, left his fans and researchers shocked. Researchers in Germany have finally come to know that Knut died of encephalitis.

In March 2011, Knut died after suffering from seizure and collapsed into his enclosure's pool. At that time, hundreds of visitors were at the Berlin Zoo to see him. His short life was a shock and it became important to know the reason, so that the incident does not get repeated with another.

FDA sends warnings to Three Tobacco firms that claim their products are ‘addiction-free’, ‘natural’

FDA sends warnings to Three Tobacco firms that claim their products

Under a 2009 tobacco-control law, the Food and Drug Administration has issued warning letters to Santa Fe Natural Tobacco Co.; ITG Brands and Sherman's 1400 Broadway N. Y. C., that it cannot market its tobacco products as addictive-free or natural.

Mitch Zeller, director of the agency's Center for Tobacco Products, has termed the action to be milestone. Zeller said, "The FDA's job is to ensure tobacco products are not marketed in a way that leads consumers to believe cigarettes with descriptors like 'additive-free' and 'natural' pose fewer health risks than other cigarettes, unless the claims have been scientifically supported".

Kids’ inactivity may be offset with Short bouts of exercise

Kids’ inactivity may be offset with Short bouts of exercise

A latest study, published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, has suggested that short exercise sessions in children at the time when they are inactive may counterbalance the effects of the lack of more constant exercise

In a media release from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the study has suggested that children when interrupted sedentary periods with 3 minutes of moderate-intensity walking in every 30 minutes had lower levels of blood glucose and insulin in comparison to the time when they used to remain inactive for 3 hours.

Study suggests Goths at higher risk of depression

Study suggests Goths at higher risk of depression

A new study, published in the journal Lancet Psychiatry, has suggested that youngster who identify as Goths likely have an increased risk of depression and self-harm. The link between them was not fully explained by the researchers but then they have suggested that Goths tendency to distance them from society could play a part.

Since long, the youth have been getting inclined towards Goth movement in which the main emphasis is put on black clothes, heavy black make-up and at times gloomy music with doom laden lyrics.

During the study, researchers analyzed 3,694 15-year-olds based in Bristol and found that the more young people were inclined towards Goth subculture the higher were their chances of self-harm and depression.

70-Year-Old Utah Man Dies of Plague

70-Year-Old Utah Man Dies of Plague

US health officials have reported that total deaths caused due to plague this year have reached four after the death of a 70-year-old man in Utah. Officials said the victim might have contracted the disease from a flea or contact with a dead animal.

JoDee Baker, an epidemiologist with the agency, said in a statement that the most common way to get infected is through flea or contact with a dead animal.

The rare disease which is spread by rodents and fleas is naturally occurring in Utah rodents and is often seen in prairie dog population.

Neuroticism May Not Be So Bad

Neuroticism May Not Be So Bad

A recent study has shown that neurotics are more suitable for creative jobs. Study researchers said so far they are not aware of what drives neuroticism and the creativity, but they suggest that it could be down to the fact that people who score highly on neuroticism tests tend to do a lot of thinking.

Some previously conducted studies have set connection between neurotic unhappiness and creativity, but no one ever came across what was going on in the brain to make this happen.

Now researchers of the study published yesterday in Trends in Cognitive Sciences have come up with a new hypothesis. Neurotics ruminate on problems, delving into their causes and the negative effects these might have. They replay these scenarios, amplifying their worries.

Children Unvaccinated For Preventable Diseases Pose Public Health Threat

Children Unvaccinated For Preventable Diseases Pose Public Health Threat

According to a government study released on Thursday, children who remain unvaccinated for preventable diseases can become a public health threat. Only 1.7% of US parents of kindergartners sought exemptions in 2014 from laws, showed study.

Researchers during the study found that rates of parents seeking exemption varied across the nation. One of the states reported over 6% of parents seeking exemptions.

Dr. Anne Schuchat, Director of the CDC's National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, said, "Pockets of children who miss vaccinations exist in our communities and they leave these communities vulnerable to outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases".

Healthy diet linked to Lower Risk of Birth Defects

Healthy diet linked to Lower Risk of Birth Defects

According to a latest research, women eating healthy diet before and at the time of pregnancy have increased chances of delivering a healthy baby. A team of medical experts at the University Of Utah School Of Medicine carried out the research and found that women who follow healthy diet have about 37% lower risk of child born with heart defect.

Many babies take birth with a rare birth defect of heart known as tetralogy of Fallot. It is a complex heart defect due to which babies turn blue as their blood becomes unable to carry sufficient oxygen. The researchers analyzed data for 10,000 women, who gave birth to a baby with heart defects between October 1997 and December 2009.

People Live Longer But Sicker Lives: Study

People Live Longer But Sicker Lives: Study

According to a new study, people throughout the world are living longer life, but they spend this longer life battling with several sicknesses. The study researchers, during their study, studied all major diseases and injuries in 188 countries.

According to an analysis published in The Lancet journal, the general health has shown major improvement across the world. This improvement is a result of significant progress against infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS and malaria in the past decade.

General health has improved, but healthy life expectancy of people has not increased to a desired level. This shows that people are living for more number of years but with illness and disability, states study.

Research supports Casual Role of Vitamin D in MS susceptibility

Research supports Casual Role of Vitamin D in MS susceptibility

A research has raised concerns by unveiling that lack of vitamin D could be a direct reason of multiple sclerosis (MS). Researchers said that it is a matter of concern as there are so many people who do not have proper levels of vitamin D.

Study researchers said that the findings could also explain as to why rates of MS are more in high-latitude regions like Northern Europe, where the sun does not come out easily. Sunshine is the main source of vitamin D.

In the past as well many researchers have suggested a link between lower vitamin D levels and a higher risk of MS. In the latest study, the researchers have shown a genetic correlation that strongly hints towards the link.

Obama's Advisory Council asks Medicaid Officials to Widen Access to Prescription Drugs

Obama's Advisory Council asks Medicaid Officials to Widen Access to Prescription

As per reports, health care experts have told the White House that widening the access to prescription drugs by federal and state Medicaid officials will help to cure several thousands of people battling with hepatitis C.

The Public Health Service and President Obama's Advisory Council on H.I.V./AIDS told the administration that the restrictions, such as barring patients who have been treated for alcohol or drug abuse within 12 months, are not sound medical practice.

The New York Times reported that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has also expressed concerns about it. CDC opposed state rules such as requiring patients to have been free of drug or alcohol abuse within 12 months or requiring an infectious disease expert to prescribe the drugs.

Drinking 500ml Water Half an Hour before a Meal Can Help In Weight Loss

Drinking 500ml Water Half an Hour before a Meal Can Help In Weight Loss

A recently conducted study has suggested that drinking almost 500ml of water almost half an hour before eating main meals can be an efficient way for those people who want to reduce their weight.

The study, published in the journal Obesity, showed positive initial results for the trial. The team also hopes that their findings will surely inform further research into the benefits of water preloading before meals.

According to a release from the University of Birmingham, the researchers during their study recruited obese adult participants from general practices, and monitored them for over a period of 12-week.

Different throat bacteria in people with schizophrenia

Different throat bacteria in people with schizophrenia

A paper published in the journal Peer J. yesterday shows that schizophrenia in a person can be detected by looking in the colonies of bacteria living in the throat of the person. Scientists have been long making efforts in vain to establish a link between schizophrenia and the immune system.

Schizophrenic patients appear to have weaker immune system, but researchers have so far not been able to unravel the mystery behind the connection of the two. However, researchers have recently talked about the possibility of detecting the risk of the disease by looking into the microbiome—the colonies of bacteria that live in and around our bodies.

These bacteria play an important role in all sorts of functions, including regulating our moods and modulating our immune systems.

Female Viagra gets approval in US

Female Viagra gets approval in US

Federal health officials gave approval for female Viagra on Tuesday to treat low drive for sex in women in the US. The approval means the first-ever prescription drug intended to boost sexual desire in women who lack it will not be available over counters.

The companies say that the drug is meant for treating premenopausal women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) or unexplained loss of libido. The disorder is believed to affect about 10% of women.

However, the approval of the drug has sparked a debate. Dr. Woodcocks says women who have not attained menopause can only use the drug to better their plight. The drug would only be available from certified health care professionals and certified pharmacies to ensure it is not misused.

Need to understand benefits of insurer mega-mergers

Need to understand benefits of insurer mega-mergers

Concerns over lack of competition in the health industry have again taken the driving seat after Anthem's proposed merger with Cigna following Aetna's acquisition of Humana. Experts say there is a need that policy makers must take cognizance of potential benefits of industry consolidation.

Consumers could have less burden of shelling out money for costly medicines if there is greater efficiency and market power of larger insurance plans, which could be achieved by offsetting the bargaining power of health-care providers.

Only one or two hospitals dictate the cost of care in many US communities. It was learnt from recent report by Kaufman, Hall & Associates LLC that a jump of 44% took place in the number of hospital mergers and acquisitions between 2010 and 2014.

Fatigue from overnight work Surgeon poses no risk to patients: Study

Fatigue from overnight work Surgeon poses no risk to patients: Study

A new study conducted in Ontario has debunked the belief that performance of doctors while doing elective surgery suffers because of not getting sleep the night before. A previous research said that sleep-deprived physicians are a risk for patients.

Published in the New England Journal of Medicine Monday, the study showed that there are very less chances for a patient to die as he undergoes an elective daytime procedure at the hands of a physician who worked between midnight and 7 am. The patient is not even likely to suffer complications or be readmitted to hospital.

The effectiveness of the treatment is almost similar for patients treated by either the doctor who worked between midnight and 7 am or the same fully rested doctor.

Man with West Nile Virus Dies from Unrelated Causes

Man with West Nile Virus Dies from Unrelated Causes

As per reports, for the first time this year a Baltimore County resident who was contracted to West Nile Virus has suddenly died, but due to unrelated causes. Officials said there are still chances that the virus could spread to more people.

Christie Ileto, explaining how health leaders are minimizing the risk, said in a statement that after the news of death of an elderly on Monday, the health department issued orders of spraying within a mile of where he lived.

The officials are now concerned about what they can do to avoid the spread of the virus. The elderly gentleman who passed away on Monday was tested positive for the mosquito borne illness, but his death occurred from something unrelated.



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