Health News

‘Exploding head syndrome’ appears to be more common than previously thought: Study

‘Exploding head syndrome’ appears to be more common than previously thought

A new study has revealed that an unexpectedly high percentage of young people experience 'exploding head syndrome', a psychological phenomenon in which people are awakened by abrupt loud noises and sensation of an explosion in their head.

The 'exploding head syndrome' can result in sufferers hearing explosions or other loud noises as they attempt to drift off to sleep. However, all these sounds are not real rather they are auditory sleep hallucinations.

It has been found that nearly one in five of interviewed college students experienced the syndrome at least once. Some students explained that the syndrome has significantly impacted their lives.

Decline in Number of Kids eating Fast Food

Decline in Number of Kids eating Fast Food

A new study found that the number of United States kids gulping fast food on any given day has been declining. The study, which included data from 2003 to 2010, found that calories from some types of fast foods have also declined.

Co-author of the study, Colin D. Rehm from Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts, said that some previous studies had included menu item, but the new study actually considered what Children across the country are eating. While talking to Reuters Health, Rehm said, "The take-home message is that changes can be made, whether they are due to consumer preference or due to what the restaurants have done themselves. It shows that change is possible".

FDA and L.A. Star Seafood enter into Consent Decree

FDA and L.A. Star Seafood enter into Consent Decree

The US Department of Justice (DOJ) has ordered L. A. Star Seafood Company to stop processing and distributing smoked, salt-cured and pickled seafood products until they improve their sanitary conditions and work as per the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

The Los Angeles food processor and distributor was given the orders as links were found between its ready-to-eat smoked and pickled fish and listeriosis and botulism. The prosecutors were of the view that the manufacturer has been targeted earlier as well by inspectors with the US Food and Drug Administration.

Last Thursday, US District Judge Michael W. Fitzgerald entered into a consent decree of permanent injunction (PDF) against the company and its owners, Sam and Sima Goldring.

Boys and Girls are conceived in Equal Numbers: Study

Boys and Girls are conceived in Equal Numbers: Study

A new study has revealed that when sperm meets egg, the two genders are conceived in equal numbers, according to the data analyzed by the research team. Despite this fact, more male babies than female babies are born every year worldwide. The new study has showed that more boys are born because more females than males die before birth, which results in excess male births.

The study has debunked the belief found in many textbooks and scientific article that conception is dominated by males, said Steven Orzack, a study author.

White House Announces National Action Plan to Combat Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

White House Announces National Action Plan to Combat Antibiotic-Resistant

It has been reported that the White House on March 27 unveiled its National Action Plan for combating antibiotic-resistant bacteria. As per sources, the new five-year plan worth $1.2 billion would include both human and animal health factors.

Earlier in September 2014, President Obama issued an executive order to fight Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria that led to the creation of an interagency taskforce, led by the Secretaries of Agriculture, Defense and Health and Human Services.

Mental illness could be linked to Germanwings Crash

Mental illness could be linked to Germanwings Crash

Investigators are trying to know the exact cause of Germanwings crash, but according to mental health experts, any mental illness that Germanwings co-pilot Andreas Lubitz had is the only possible reason of the tragedy. As per some scientific studies, most of the people who have mental health problems do not hurt other people.

Seena Fazel, a professor of forensic psychiatry at the University of Oxford in England, said factors like anger or drug and alcohol abuse are usually involved when people commit strange acts such as deliberately crashing a plane.

Clonidine Topical Gel Didn’t Meet Statistical Significance in Phase 3 Clinical Study

Clonidine Topical Gel Didn’t Meet Statistical Significance in Phase 3 Clinical

BioDelivery Sciences International, a specialty pharmaceutical company, announced that phase 3 clinical study of Clonidine topical gel did not met the statistical significance.

Clonidine topical gel was compared to placebo in the phase 3 study for the treatment of painful diabetic neurology.

On one hand where the results were not favorable in the primary efficacy endpoint, certain secondary endpoints showed statistically significant improvement over placebo.

In addition, a strong safety profile for the product was observed. The company said in a statement that the results of the trails will allow them to refine the protocol criteria to capture a more 'enriched' patient population and target site selection.

Gainesville Libraries to Launch New Programs for Children with Autism

Gainesville Libraries to Launch New Programs for Children with Autism

In Autism Awareness Month, Gainesville libraries have decided to launch new programs geared toward children with autism.

It has been found that the Alachua County Library District has planned to unveil Sensory Storytime for children with sensory integration challenges.

Erin Phemester, youth services senior manager at the Alachua County Library District, through an email said that the new storytime program aims at involving children, mainly those with autism.

The very first program has been scheduled to start on April 19 at the Headquarters Library, at 401 E. University Ave. And registrations for the first storytime event will start on Wednesday. Phemester said during the storytime, the children will listen to stories and songs and will play with lap-dogs.

Pediatricians urge to use Metric System to measure medications

Pediatricians urge to use Metric System to measure medications

According to reports, pediatricians have urged caregiver and medical providers to use only one method to measure medications. Earlier, a case was reported where a child was rushed to the emergency due to suspected overdose. Caregivers usually use a teaspoon or tablespoon to give medicine to a patient. As there is no definite method to give medicine to a patient, it becomes difficult to solve the problem of overdosing.

Now, according to pediatricians, parents or caregivers should use the metric system while giving medication to a patient. Earlier, a report published in the journal Pediatrics provided the rationale to use this system. The new guidelines represent a significant step to increase safety of giving medications to kids.

Consumption of Pesticides through Diet lowers Sperm Count

Consumption of Pesticides through Diet lowers Sperm Count

Harvard University researchers said in a report on Monday that consumption of fruits and vegetables that contain relatively large amounts of pesticide residue may alter sperm count of men. This poses serious risk of developing fertility problems.

The research was conducted by researchers at the T. H. Chan School of Public Health. The research has been claimed to be the first to establish a link between pesticides in fruits and vegetables and reproductive problems.

Urgent Need to Control Promotion and Sale of E-Cigarettes among Children

Urgent Need to Control Promotion and Sale of E-Cigarettes among Children

A survey was carried out involving more than 16,000 teenagers in north-west England. The results unveiled that one in five students aged between 14 and 17 has bought or tried e-cigarettes.

This has led scientists to ask for urgent controls on the promotion and sale of e-cigarettes to children. The poll unveiled that nearly one in 20 teenagers who bought or tried e-cigarettes have never smoked conventional cigarette before.

It indicates that vaping has become a new thing to try among teenagers. However, the survey could not unveil who among them became long-term users of e-cigarettes or the devices were used to assist them quitting traditional tobacco smoking.

Detection of Sugar Molecule Biomarkers through MRI can Make Biopsies more Effective

Detection of Sugar Molecule Biomarkers through MRI can Make Biopsies

In a breakthrough revelation, researchers from Johns Hopkins Medicine have suggested that if magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machines are used to detect sugar molecule biomarkers, it might improve the efficacy of biopsies.

The study researchers shared that the new imaging method was able to detect telltale sugar molecules that were shed by the outer membranes of cancerous cells.

Jeff Bulte, PhD, a professor of radiology and radiological science in the Institute for Cell Engineering at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, explained that when cells become cancerous, some proteins present on their outer membranes shed sugar molecules making them less slimy.

Poor children’s brain less developed than those from wealthier families

Poor children’s brain less developed than those from wealthier families

A new study has found that brain scans of children who come from low-income families are less developed compared to children from wealthier families. The study was conducted by researchers from University of Hawaii and University of California-San Diego.

According to researchers, during the study, they found that brains of children from poorer families have smaller brain surfaces and poorer cognitive performance. They also found that different parts of the brain that help in language, reading and spatial skills were less developed.

An apple a day not adequate to maintain health

An apple a day not adequate to maintain health

According to a new study, it's not sure that an apple a day would keep the doctor away. The study says those who consume apples daily have to visit a doctor as many times as those who eat fewer or no apples.

The results of the study do not indicate that consuming apples is not a good choice. It simply means that one can't depend on just one kind of food in order to maintain health and avoid sickness.

According to approximately one-third of the adults studied, they didn't visit doctor more than once in the previous year and others said that they visited at least twice. It was found in a preliminary analysis that apple eaters had somewhat fewer visits than those who avoided apples i. e. consumed less than one daily or no apples.

Scientists find link between Paralysis cluster cases and polio-like virus

Scientists find link between Paralysis cluster cases and polio-like virus

A new research has found strong evidence that the recent, alarming clusters of sudden-onset paralysis cases, most of them in California and Colorado, were caused due to the same virus that was responsible for hundreds of severe respiratory infections in US children previous year.

In a study published on Monday, UCSF scientists said the main reason for worry is that the enterovirus identified in the research is a new strain that seems to have mutated to become more polio-like, has raised the prospects of outbreaks of the disease in future.

Children’s Liquid Medicines must be measured in Metric Units

Children’s Liquid Medicines must be measured in Metric Units

It has been suggested by US pediatricians that children's liquid medicines must be measured in metric units to reduce the instances of overdose, common with teaspoons and tablespoons.

Dr. Ian Paul, a pediatrician at Penn State Milton S. Hershey Children's Hospital, said that many children reach to emergency rooms after accidental medicine overdoses every year and reason is often badly labeled containers or unclear directions.

"Even though we know metric units are safer and more accurate, too many healthcare providers are still writing that prescription using spoon-based dosing. Some parents use household spoons to administer it, which can lead to dangerous mistakes", said Paul, who is also lead author of new metric dosing guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).

High Doses didn't finish Pain of Jason Bishop

High Doses didn't finish Pain of Jason Bishop

Frustrated by chronic suffering, Jason Bishop from Tomah visited various Department of Veterans Affairs hospitals. According to 39-year-old Bishop, the VA hospitals presented him remedy that includes prescriptions for narcotics. Bishop said that the doses didn't finish pain.

Bishop said, "They don't fix you. They are not attempting to come across an answer. They just manage you with medication". The hospital is called as 'Candy Land' in the neighborhood due to the prescriptions of narcotics came from its physicians. Earlier, a former Marine Jason Simcakoski died in the hospital's inpatient care unit and cause of the death was an overdose. On Monday, the United States Residence and Senate committees will hold joint field hearing in Tomah.

New Rice-Cooking Technique cuts Calories by 50%

New Rice-Cooking Technique cuts Calories by 50%

Researchers have developed a new technique of cooking rice that cuts calories. A cup of cooked white rice contains 204 calories, but the new cooking technique developed by researchers at the College of Chemical Sciences, Colombo, Western, Sri Lanka, cuts that into half.

The Sri Lankan researchers are aiming at curbing obesity in areas where rice is staple food. The new technique developed by them will not make you unhappy after having that extra rice. You would also not require to follow a no- rice diet to lose weight.

Doctors do not tell Alzheimer’s Patients their Diagnosis

Doctors do not tell Alzheimer’s Patients their Diagnosis

A report has showed that only 40% of people with Alzheimer's disease or their caregivers were told the diagnosis by their doctor. The new Alzheimer's Association 2015 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures report was released today, revealing that Alzheimer's or their caregivers were confirmed about the diagnosis of the disease only after it had become more advanced.

The association said that this is a very big concern as the delay in diagnosis negatively affects the decision making of patients about care plans. Also, it may diminish legal and financial issues and ability of patients to participate in research.

Bio-hackers from California Successfully Test World’s First Night Vision Eye Drops

California Successfully Test World’s First Night Vision Eye Drops

A team of bio-hackers from California's Science for the Masses has successfully tested world's first night vision eye drops. The team claims that their eye drops gives an average person's eyes the capability to see in the dark.

Gabriel Licina is the person who agreed to undergo a bio-hacking procedure that would allow his eyes to see even in the absence of light.

The team during the procedure pinned opened Licina's eyes in order to avoid blinking. After being held open, his eyes were then flushed with a saline solution to wash away any possible contaminants, said researcher.

The bio-hackers then poured three doses of microlitres of the black Ce6 (Chlorine e6) solution onto his eyeballs, according to CNET.



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