Science

Scientists reveal secrets behind winning 'rock-paper-scissors' game

Scientists reveal secrets behind winning 'rock-paper-scissors' gameWashington, May 5 : A new scientific way has been found to win the schoolyard game of 'rock-paper-scissors'.

The study by scientists at Zhejiang University in China has revealed that players tend to repeat the pattern of moves that makes them win the game, meaning if they won with by offering up a 'rock', they're more likely to play rock again, the Huffington Post reported.

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Two suns could up chances of habitable 'Exomoons'

Two suns could up chances of habitable 'Exomoons'Washington, May 5 : Scientists have claimed that two sun-like stars are always better and moons in close binary solar systems have a better chance of hosting life than those in single-star systems.

Paul Mason, an astrophysicist at the University of Texas at El Paso, said that the ideal circumstance is solar twins and solar-type stars with companions work really well, Discovery News reported.

He said it works better than our own solar-type star without a companion and there is a plenty of room for several habitable planets and these may be places where many worlds in system could be habitable.

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Chernobyl's birds adapting to low-levels of radiation

Chernobyl's birds adapting to low-levels of radiationWashington, May 3 : A new research has suggested that birds can adapt to the low-levels of radiation found near Chernobyl, where the catastrophic nuclear disaster took place in 1986.

According to the Verge, while going through previous studies, scientists found that birds near the Japanese Fukushima reactor that experienced a meltdown in 2011 had less chances of survival than Chernobyl's birds, since they probably had more time to adapt.

To test out their theory, scientists collected blood samples and feathers from different bird species in both low and high-radiation that persists around Chernobyl.

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Supernovae help gauge power of cosmic lenses

Supernovae help gauge power of cosmic lensesWashington, May 2 : Researchers have said that distant exploding stars observed by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope are providing them with a powerful tool to determine the strength of naturally-occurring "cosmic lenses" that are used to magnify objects in the remote universe.

Two teams of astronomers, working independently, observed three such exploding stars, called supernovae. Their light was amplified by the immense gravity of massive galaxy clusters in the foreground-a phenomenon called gravitational lensing.

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'Terminator'-style liquid metal could heal severed nerves

'Terminator'-style liquid metal could heal severed nervesWashington, April 29 : Researchers have developed a new technique to bridge the gap between the two ends of a cut nerve with liquid metal.

Biomedical researchers in China announced the promising use of liquid metal to bridge the gap between the two ends of a cut nerve and added that it is a futuristic way of improving on current methods of nerve rehab that could prevent long-term disabilities, CNET reported.

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Scent of male experimenters stress out mice and rats in labs

Scent of male experimenters stress out mice and rats in labsWashington, April 29 : In an attempt to find out why some scientists are unable to replicate research findings on rodents, a new study has concluded that it's all got to do with the gender of the experimenters.

An international team of pain researchers led by scientists at McGill University in Montreal found that the presence of male experimenters produced a stress response in mice and rats equivalent to that caused by restraining the rodents for 15 minutes in a tube or forcing them to swim for three minutes.

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Binary supermassive black holes discovered

Binary supermassive black holes discoveredWashington, April 23 : An international research team has discovered a pair of supermassive black holes in orbit around one another.

This is the first time such a pair could be found in an ordinary galaxy. They were discovered because they ripped apart a star when ESA's space observatory XMM-Newton happened to be looking in their direction.

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Now, mantis shrimp inspired materials that are tougher than airplanes

Now, mantis shrimp inspired materials that are tougher than airplanesWashington, April 23 : Researchers have developed a design structure for composite materials which is more impact resistant and tougher than the standard used in airplanes.

The peacock mantis shrimp, or stomatopod, is a 4- to 6-inch-long rainbow-colored crustacean with a fist-like club that accelerates underwater faster than a 22-calibur bullet.

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Our ancestors enjoyed summer holidays at Antartica!

Our ancestors enjoyed summer holidays at Antartica!Washington, April 22 : If this information stands true, the history books have to be rewritten soon. According to scientists, some parts on the coldest region on our earth - Antartica - was as warm as today's California coast.

Not only this, polar regions of the southern Pacific Ocean registered 21st-century Florida heat, according to scientists who used a new measurement technique called carbonate clumped isotope thermometry to measure past temperatures.

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Wild animals interbred with domesticated ones until recently: Study

Wild animals interbred with domesticated ones until recently: StudyWashington, Apr 19 : Recent research on the domestication of donkeys, camelids (which includes dromedaries, Bactrian camels, llamas and alpacas) pigs, cattle, sheep and goats suggests that neither intentional breeding nor genetic isolation were as significant as traditionally thought.

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Cold beer's origins revealed

Cold beer's origins revealedWashington, April 10 : Researchers have solved the mystery of the cold-adapted yeast that blended with a distant cousin to make the lager-churning hybrid endured for almost 500 years.

A team led by University of Wisconsin-Madison Professor of Genetics Chris Hittinger confirms that Saccharomyces eubayanus, the wandering parent of hybrid lager yeast discovered in 2011, is indeed a native of Patagonia.

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Humans are born with basic fundamental knowledge of language

Humans are born with basic fundamental knowledge of languageWashington, Apr 9 : A new study has revealed that humans are in fact born with the basic fundamental knowledge of language.

While languages differ from each other in many ways, certain aspects appear to be shared across languages. These aspects might stem from linguistic principles that are active in all human brains.

A natural question then arises: are infants born with knowledge of how the human words might sound like? Are infants biased to consider certain sound sequences as more word-like than others?

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Mars' Curiosity rover finds 'Australia' on Red Planet!

Mars' Curiosity rover finds 'Australia' on Red Planet!Washington, Apr 9 : NASA's Mars rover Curiosity has begun operations in a new area on the Red Planet nicknamed "the Kimberly" after the Western Australian region.

In a new image uploaded to the Mars Science Laboratory raw image archive, it seems "the Kimberly" is a little more Australian than mission managers originally thought, Discovery News reported.

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3D model of human parasite to help curb malaria

3D model of human parasite to help curb malariaNew York, April 7 : There might soon be new approaches to tackle the deadly malaria.

A research team at University of California, Riverside has generated a 3D model of the human malaria parasite genome at three different stages in the parasite's life cycle. The parasite that causes malaria in humans is Plasmodium falciparum.

To understand the biology of an organism, scientists need to understand the information encoded in the genome sequence.

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How avalanches are triggered in Himalayas revealed

How avalanches are triggered in Himalayas revealedWashington, April 5 : Researchers have said that the amount of snow needed to trigger an avalanche in the Himalayans can be up to four times smaller than in the Alps.

The proposed universal model from a materials scientist at Queen Mary University of London could have implications in better understanding strategies for mitigating natural hazards related to snow and rock avalanches and safeguarding people on mountain villages, roads and ski resorts.

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