Environment

Community makes efforts to save beached whales on Nova Scotia’s Cape Breton Island

Community makes efforts to save beached whales on Nova Scotia’s Cape Breton

According to a local resident, inhabitants of a community on Cape Breton's west coast put buckets of water over some beached pilot whales and moved in neck-deep water in order to save the mammals after they were stuck on the rocky coasts of St. George's Bay.

According to Linden MacIntyre, a former journalist, the whales were at McKays Point off Shore Road in early Tuesday morning. There were 16 whales.

MacIntyre added that 11 whales survived, whereas five died, together with a small whale and a bigger whale, which was nearly three meters long. On Thursday afternoon, the Fisheries Department reported that 10 whales were left and six had died.

Warm Pacific Temperatures Increasing Toxic Algae Blooming In Warm Water from California to Alaska

Warm Pacific Temperatures Increasing Toxic Algae Blooming In Warm Water

Researchers aboard a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) research vessel said they have detected that toxic algae blooming off the West Coast is much denser. The algae blooming stretch from at least California to Alaska and has shut down lucrative fisheries.

The team stated that this microscopic algae spreads from up to 40 miles wide and 650 feet deep, and is flourishing amid unusually warm Pacific Ocean temperatures.

Shellfish managers on Tuesday announced the area off Washington's coast closed for Dungeness crab fishing. The statement came after finding revealed the elevated levels of marine toxins in tested crab meat.

Size of Gulf of Mexico 'Dead Zone' above average this year

Size of Gulf of Mexico 'Dead Zone' above average this year

Federal scientists reported Tuesday that size of the Gulf of Mexico dead zone is above average this year. It’s a region of oxygen-depleted water off the Louisiana and Texas coasts and is a great threat to survival of sea life.

This year’s zone sprawls over 6,474 square miles, which is equivalent to the size of Connecticut and Rhode Island combined. Incessant rains in June throughout the Mississippi River watershed is the major cause behind its size bigger than average, said the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

The bottom of a body of water when there isn't enough oxygen to support life is called a dead zone. Nutrient runoff, mostly from over-application of fertilizer on agricultural fields during the spring, creates it. It is also called as hypoxia.

Stopping burning fossil fuel now is best solution to climate change problem

Stopping burning fossil fuel now is best solution to climate change problem

According to researchers, oceans are heading towards irreversible damage and a geoengineering technique to remove carbon from the atmosphere is also not good enough to save them. German researchers say that there is not better remedy to the problem than stop burning fossil fuels now.

A study led by Thomas Gasser of the Institut Pierre-Simon Laplace, near Paris, measured the trade-off between reducing emissions and carbon-removing technologies.

Scientists wrote in Nature Communications, “This study suggests that negative emissions alone are unlikely to be the panacea that will limit global warming below 2C and that conventional mitigation – that is, reduced consumption of fossil fuels – should remain a significant part of any climate policy aiming at this target”.

Humpback Whale washed ashore in Pacifica

Humpback Whale washed ashore in Pacifica

A 39-foot humpback whale was found dead in Pacifica on Sunday and beachgoers gathered on Tuesday to have a last look as it was towed out to sea by a Santa Cruz tow boat company. After a high tide was seen, the company towed it way and will dispose it once they pass the Farrallon islands.

The total number of whales found dead in Pacifica this year has reached three. Officials at The Marine Mammal Center say that a ship might have hit the adult humpback whale. Preliminary indications suggest that injuries on the body of the whale appeared to have come from a strike from a ship in Pacifica over the weekend.

New App aims to Identify Endangered or at-Risk Species

New App aims to Identify Endangered or at-Risk Species

With an aim to help save endangered fish species, the US Fish and Wildlife Service and angling app FishBrain have joined hands to create a new app. The app will help people identify, report and have more knowledge about endangered and species at risk in the US.

Experts said it will be a social network app meant for American anglers and others will be free to use it. The Android and iOS app can be downloaded for free and has been designed to encourage people to play an important role in conservation.

FishBrain is already quite a popular app among anglers in America. The app is meant for one and all, but is primary focus will be on those people who spend more time near bodies of water within the US borders like anglers.

Russia submits Revised Bid for Claim over Territories in Arctic to UN

Russia submits Revised Bid for Claim over Territories in Arctic to UN

On Tuesday, the Foreign Ministry unveiled that Russia has resubmitted a bid for territories in the Arctic to the United Nations. In the revised bid, Russia has claimed around 463,000 square miles of Arctic sea shelf.

Many nations including Russia, the US, Canada, Denmark, and Norway are trying to have a control over the parts of Arctic, which as per experts is believed to have up to a quarter of earth’s unexplored oil and gas.

With passage of time, competition and rivalry with regard to these parts is increased as reduced polar ice has opened up more new opportunities for exploration. Out of all, Russia was the first one to announce its claim in 2002, but the UN sent it back stating that it did not have proper evidence.

Scientists Predict Toxic Algae Bloom in Lake Erie

Scientists Predict Toxic Algae Bloom in Lake Erie

Scientists have given prediction about one of the most severe outbreaks of toxic algae blooms on western Lake Erie very much similar to the one in last August that disrupted the water supply of nearly 40, 000 people in Toledo and southern Michigan.

Researcher said that drinking water of the region as of now is safe, but acres of spreading green muck has been floating around Toledo’s water intake pipe on Lake Erie.

Joel Brammeier, president of the nonprofit Alliance for the Great Lakes, said, “It’s a signal that our Great Lakes region is sliding backwards. If we lose clean drinking water, our region loses everything”.

Expected Emerald Ash Borer Invasion makes 3 City Councilmen to call for Expansion in Tree Removal Budget

Expected Emerald Ash Borer Invasion makes 3 City Councilmen to call

On Thursday, Omaha City Councilman Pete Festersen said he has plans to add money to the 2016 budget for the purpose of having additional three-person tree-trimming crew and also to buy specialized trucks owing to emerald ash borer.

The city council has inquired from the city’s Finance Department about the cost to add the trimmers and to lease-purchase equipment. Festersen said he wants to know the cost first and will then propose for an amendment to Mayor Jean Stothert’s proposed 2016 budget.

American Littoral Society Makes Effort to Re-Establish Oyster Colony in Barnegat Bay

American Littoral Society Makes Effort to Re-Establish Oyster Colony in Barnegat

An environmental group on Wednesday took a major step to re-establish an oyster colony in Barnegat Bay. The American Littoral Society took several oyster seedlings by boat to an artificial reef about a quarter-mile off a section of Berkeley Township called Good Luck Point.

Volunteers who participated in the effort on Wednesday said when the boats were carrying the baby oysters from the dock, they carried away with them hopes of environmentalists and scientists of a cleaner bay that in the future will be home to sea life that has long ago disappeared.

Rise in Number of Compound Flood Events in many US Coastal Cities

Rise in Number of Compound Flood Events in many US Coastal Cities

A novel study has unveiled that rising sea levels could prove quite dangerous for people. It has been said so as oceans could wash away almost two-fifths of all American homes. It is known that coastal cities aware how to deal with high tides, but researchers have affirmed that with passage of time, sea will become more unpredictable.

Combination of tidal, climatic and interactions between the ocean and existing infrastructure on the coasts can lead to heavy flooding and storm events. Over the last half century, a rise has been witnessed in such events.

Dozens of Mayors Attend Conference with Pope Francis to Discuss Slavery, Climate Change

Dozens of Mayors Attend Conference with Pope Francis to Discuss Slavery, Climate

Several dozens of mayors from major cities across the world gathered in Vatican to discuss the link between slavery and climate change. The Vatican conference of last week clearly showed how secular leaders from across the world are responding to the lead taken by Pope Francis to protect the environment.

Majorly the conference aimed to discuss the necessary steps that could be taken in cities to combat climate change. The mayors who attended the conference pledge to lobby their governments to work for a binding climate treaty this fall in Paris at the UN-sponsored climate change talks.

New York City, San Francisco, New Orleans, Boston, Madrid and Rome were among the cities whose mayors attended the Vatican conference of last week with Pope Francis.

Alaska’s wildfire season of this year could soon be state's worst

Alaska’s wildfire season of this year could soon be state's worst

This summer, Alaska is being hit by hundreds of wildfires and this has burnt millions of acres of trees. Recently, at the Fairbanks compound of Alaska’s Division of Forestry, workers were washing a mountain of fire hoses, covered with soot and they were in piles approximately six feet high and 100 feet long.

This year, approximately 3,500 smoke-jumpers, helicopter teams, hotshot crews, and other workers have come to Alaska from different parts of the country and Canada. They have together deployed approximately 830 miles of hose in order to fight fires.

Hot water kills 50% sockeye salmon migrating up Columbia River

Hot water kills 50% sockeye salmon migrating up Columbia River

A wildlife official said on Monday that nearly half of the sockeye salmon migrating up the Columbia River through Oregon and Washington state have succumbed to hot water. Survival became very difficult for more than 507,000 sockeye salmon that were swimming between two dams along a stretch of the lower Columbia River.

Only 272,000 of them have survived the journey, said Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife fisheries manager John North. This is the first time when moralities have happened at such a scale, said North.

US West Coast states are already troubled by drought conditions and the Columbia is recording the third-highest count of sockeye returning from the oceans to spawn since 1960.

Three factors pose increased risk to people living in Coastal areas

Three factors pose increased risk to people living in Coastal areas

A journal Nature Climate Change-published research has unveiled that three factors, sea-level rise, storm surges and heavy rainfall, are posing increased risk to residents living in many US cities.

One of the study researchers Steven Meyers from the University of South Florida said that the team has taken the help of historical data of rainfall, tide gauge readings and extreme weather conditions to know more about the risks that can threaten stretches of the US coast.

Wildfires Becoming More Common Across Southern Alaska

Wildfires Becoming More Common Across Southern Alaska

The US Geological Survey (USGS) revealed hundreds of wildfires have been repeatedly reported across southern Alaska. The Alaska Interagency Coordination Center tracked 290 fires in Alaska on July 25, with some 'very large' fires spread across southern Alaska.

The 2015 Alaska fire season already has been declared to be the third-largest season since reliable records began in 1950. These wildfires have burned more than 4.75 million acres.

It is said that the amount of land burned is more than double the size of Yellowstone National Park and larger than the state of New Jersey, which consists of only 4.492 million acres.

Rising sea levels pose threats to Raine Island's baby turtles

Rising sea levels pose threats to Raine Island's baby turtles

A study has showed that turtle populations are facing threats from rise in sea levels. The study was conducted to look into how the eggs of turtles are affected by saltwater. Published in the journal Royal Society Open Science and conducted by researchers from Australia's James Cook University, the study showed that the viability of turtle eggs is threatened by rising sea levels.

The number of baby turtles successfully hatched was lowered because of rising sea levels. For the study, the researchers chose one of the largest green turtle populations in the world, on largest green turtle populations in the world.

Climate Change brings rise in length of Wildfire Seasons

Climate Change brings rise in length of Wildfire Seasons

A significant rise has been witnessed in the length of wildfire seasons across the world owing to climate change, finds a new research. Researchers have stated that in the last three decades, burnable areas on earth have increased.

The research titled, Climate induced variations in global wildfire danger from 1979 to 2013, was compiled by researchers from USDA-Forest Service, South Dakota State University, the Desert Research Institute and the University of Tasmania, Australia.

Here’s Why Southern Ocean is Cloudiest region on Earth

Here’s Why Southern Ocean is Cloudiest region on Earth

Researchers have explained why clouds are present over the Southern Ocean for almost all the year. It’s surprising, but tiny marine organisms called phytoplankton have been cited by the researchers as the actual caused behind the Southern Ocean for having become the cloudiest region on Earth.

Researchers say phytoplankton live in the ocean’s stormy waters. In a new study, researchers attempted to measure how particles and gases emitted by these creatures manage to enter the atmosphere and turn into the seeds of clouds.

Legal Action filed against Beachfront Property Owners reluctant to Grant Easements for Dune Protection System formation

Legal Action filed against Beachfront Property Owners

For past many months, the Christie Administration has been saying that it will take legal actions against shore homeowners if they do not allow easements for formation of a statewide network of dunes, which are considered vital to keep the coast safe from future storms.

Finally, the administration has taken action. It has filed eminent domain filings, one in Ocean County Superior Court and the second one in Cape May County.

The legal action shows the state is quite serious to have an access to the easements, so that the US Army Corps can complete beach replenishment projects. Bob Martin, state Department of Environmental Protection Commissioner, was of the view that many owners of beachfront properties have come forth to help them.




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