Washington

Terrorist safe havens in Pakistan a serious challenge: US

Terrorist safe havens in Pakistan a serious challenge: US

Washington: A top US general has said it is difficult to destroy the "enemy" in Afghanistan if terror groups like the Haqqani network and Taliban have sanctuaries in Pakistan.

"When an enemy enjoys sanctuary like that, it's very difficult to defeat them," General John "Mick" Nicholson, who has been nominated by the Pentagon as Commander of US and NATO forces in Afghanistan, told members of the Senate Armed Services Committee, during confirmation hearing yesterday.

Nicholson said he views the terrorist safe havens inside Pakistan as a serious problem.


Important to 'enlist' Pakistan for defeating Afghan terrorists: Nicholson

Important to 'enlist' Pakistan for defeating Afghan terrorists: Nicholson

Washington, Jan. 30 : A Senior United States General John William Nicholson, nominated to head US and NATO troops in Pakistan, has said that it is important to 'enlist' Pakistan for defeating terrorists in Afghanistan.

Nicholson said that Pakistan's military operations in Fata were 'critical to defeat insurgency', reports Dawn.

Nicholson acknowledged that Pakistan's ongoing counter terrorism operations in Fata had reduced the militant ability to use Pakistani territory as a safe haven for terrorism and base of support for the insurgency in Afghanistan.

The US General added that he would work to improve the capacity to track and disrupt terrorist financing originating in Afghanistan and Pakistan.(ANI)


Seven email chains sent from Clinton's private server withheld

Seven email chains sent from Clinton's private server withheld

Washington : The US State Department has withheld release of "seven email chains" sent from former secretary of state Hillary Clinton's private server, admitting for the first time that her home server contained closely guarded government secrets.

The State Department will be denying in full seven email chains found in 22 documents, representing 37 pages. "These documents were not marked classified at the time that they were sent," the State Department Spokesman John Kirby said.

He added that the department was now investigating whether the information in them was classified at the time it passed through her private email account run on a server in her home.


'Tsunami of money' from Saudi Arabia funding 24,000 madrassas in Pakistan

'Tsunami of money' from Saudi Arabia funding 24,000 madrassas in Pakistan

Washington: About 24,000 'madrassas' in Pakistan are funded by Saudi Arabia which has unleashed a "tsunami of money" to "export intolerance", a top American senator has said adding that the US needs to end its effective acquiescence to the Saudi sponsorship of radical Islamism.

Senator Chris Murphy said Pakistan is the best example of where money coming from Saudi Arabia is funnelled to religious schools that nurture hatred and terrorism.

"In 1956, there were 244 madrassas in Pakistan. Today, there are 24,000. These schools are multiplying all over the globe. These schools, by and large, don't teach violence. They aren't the minor leagues for al-Qaeda or ISIS. But they do teach a version of Islam that leads very nicely into an anti-Shia, anti-Western militancy.


Practice does make perfect

Practice does make perfect

Washington D. C, Jan 30 : A new brain study has suggested that there is a degree of truth in the age old theory "practice makes perfect."

In this study, Faculty of Health researchers were looking at fMRI brain scans of professional ballet dancers to measure the long-term effects of learning.

"We wanted to study how the brain gets activated with long-term rehearsal of complex dance motor sequences," says Joseph DeSouza, who studies and supports people with Parkinson's disease. "The study outcome will help with understanding motor learning and developing effective treatments to rehabilitate the damaged or diseased brain."


Best defense against climate change is.

Best defense against climate change is.

Washington D. C, Jan 29 : Intact nature offers the best defense against the climate change, according to a recent study.

The study conducted by CSIRO, Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and the University of Queensland found that worldwide responses to climate change could leave people worse off in the future.

The paper discusses how certain adaptation strategies may have a negative impact on nature which in turn will impact people in the long-term.

In response to climate change, many local communities around the world are rapidly adjusting their livelihood practices to cope with climate change, sometimes with catastrophic implications for nature, according to principal researcher Dr. Tara Martin.


Head-on collision with forming planet tugged the Moon out of Earth

Head-on collision with forming planet tugged the Moon out of Earth

Washington D. C, Jan 29 : When a "planetary embryo" called Theia collided with the early Earth approximately 100 million years after the Earth was formed, the moon span off into the orbit around the nascent planet, according to a new study.

Scientists had already known about this high-speed crash, which occurred almost 4.5 billion years ago, but many thought the Earth collided with Theia (pronounced THAY-eh) at an angle of 45 degrees or more, a powerful side-swipe (simulated in this 2012 YouTube video).

The UCLA geochemists and colleagues analyzed seven rocks brought to the Earth from the moon by the Apollo 12, 15 and 17 missions, as well as six volcanic rocks from the Earth's mantle, five from Hawaii and one from Arizona.


Not just bad bosses, workers shun good ones too

Not just bad bosses, workers shun good ones too

Washington D. C, Jan 28 - It is usually perceived that people join companies but leave managers, but according to a new study, workers leave good bosses and bad bosses in equal measure.

According to University of Illinois's Ravi S. Gajendran, an organization's former employees or "alumni" can potentially be important strategic assets in the future, provided they leave on good terms.

"If you have a good relationship with an employee who's left to join a client or competitor, you can leverage that relationship and potentially use them as a source of future business or as a back-channel source of information," he said. "Therefore, thinking of ex-employees as a strategic constituency is something more organizations should start doing."


Next US President to decide on Afghan troop level

Next US President to decide on Afghan troop level

Washington : The US would draw down troop levels in Afghanistan to about 5,500 by the end of this year and after that any decision in this regard would be taken by the next US president, the White House said on Wednesday.

"The scenario that we envision right now is that we would essentially draw down troop levels to about 5,500 troops by the end of this year," White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest told reporters.

"Moving forward, the next commander in chief and his or her national security team, taking advice from our commanders on the ground in Afghanistan, will have to determine what sort of troop presence is appropriate for that country moving forward," Earnest said.


Incentive pay doesn't motivate all managers

Incentive pay doesn't motivate all managers

Washington D. C, Jan 28 : Despite incentive compensation becoming an increasingly popular practice, it is not one-size-fits-all because for some managers, performance-based pay is not motivating enough, according to a recent study.

Researcher Joyce Cong Ying Wang said the the University of Texas study examined differences in individual characteristics, specifically career ambition and task attention, and business context to see how they affected managers' responses to incentive pay.

Managers, and people in general, have inertia where they tend to do what they feel comfortable doing. The thought is that if companies provide managers with incentive pay, which is closely related to firm performance, then managers will be willing to take more risks, she said.


Here`s what next-gen Internet looks like

Here`s what next-gen Internet looks like

Washington D.C, Jan 27 : A team of researchers has come up with a scientific solution that enables future internet infrastructure to become completely open and programmable while carrying internet traffic at the speed of light.

The current internet infrastructure is not able to support independent development and innovation at physical and network layer functionalities, protocols, and services, while at the same time supporting the increasing bandwidth demands of changing and diverse applications.


'Andaman bush toad' small enough for its own genus

'Andaman bush toad' small enough for its own genus

Washington D. C., Jan. 26 : A new species of has been found on herb bush with 24mm average length, measured from its snout tip to its cloaca.

After identifying its unique morphological and skeletal characters and conducting a molecular phylogenetic analysis, not only did the researchers introduced a new species, but also added a new genus.

The proposed common name of this species is 'Andaman bush toad'.

With its significantly smaller size when compared to its relatives, the new toad species seems to have had its name predetermined by nature.


Now, womb lining test to predict IVF treatment success

Now, womb lining test to predict IVF treatment success

Washington D. C, Jan 24 : Newly discovered "genetic fingerprint" is a big breakthrough that can help doctors predict the chances of success of IVF treatment.

Fertility experts in Southampton and the Netherlands have identified a specific genetic pattern in the womb that could predict whether or not IVF treatment is likely to be successful.

Study co-lead Nick Macklon said that the discovery would help clinicians understand why IVF fails repeatedly in some women, adding it could also lead to the development of a new test to help patients understand how likely they are to achieve a pregnancy before they embark on the treatment process and to guide others on whether or not they should continue even after a number of unsuccessful cycles.


Discrimination, alcohol, tobacco tied to panic attacks in minorities

Discrimination, alcohol, tobacco tied to panic attacks in minorities

Washington D. C, Jan 24 : A new study has linked discrimination, alcohol and tobacco to panic attacks among minority Americans.

Researchers from the University of Alabama studied demographic and socioeconomic variables in relation to panic attacks among African-Americans, Afro-Caribbeans, Hispanics and Asians.

Although there is a body of research on the harmful effects of negative altercations on mental health, knowledge gaps persist around immigrant health, said Assistant Professor Henna Budhwani.

Budhwani added that immigrants, particularly those who are undocumented, are often resistant to speak to researchers for fear of deportation or police engagement. Furthermore, some may not speak English fluently, making communication difficult.


Classroom with green landscape view boosts student performance

if you have a green view outside your window, you'll do better on tests.

Washington D. C, Jan 24 : According to a new study, if you have a green view outside your window, you'll do better on tests.

The University of Illinois Department of Landscape Architecture research found that students with a green view outside a classroom window performed better on tests requiring focused attention and recovered better from stress.

It is the first study to establish a causal relationship between exposure to a green view and students' performance, said William Sullivan, head of the landscape architecture department.

Students' capacity to pay attention increased 13 percent if they had a green view outside their classroom window, the study found.


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