Skype's translator rolls out support for French and German languages

Skype's translator rolls out support for French and German languages

Washington, June 18 : Microsoft has released support for French and German for its Skype Translator app.

With the release of these two languages, brings the total number of languages supported by Skype to six, with English, French, German, Italian, Mandarin and Spanish. This is nearly 30 percent of the world's native speakers.

According to The Verge, Skype Translator works by using a modified version of the Skype Windows 8 app to translate spoken words into text or audio. The software was first introduced back in December during an early preview and while there were a few translation issues, it works well enough to hold a conversation in a language user does not understand.


Kindle launches a new Paperwhite E-Reader with a new easier to read font

Kindle launches a new Paperwhite E-Reader with a new easier to read font

Washington, June 18 : Amazon has announced a new paper-white e-reader.

The new e-reader has a 6-inch 300ppi display and a new font and book layout system that will make it easier to read the text. The new Paperwhite e-reader will be available at USD 119.

According to the TechCrunch.com, the reader is available for pre-order now and will ship on June 30.

The e-reader also includes a backlight and is available with or without cellular data and Amazon's advertisement offers. The WAN model costs USD 209 without special offers.

Like the previous Paper-white this one also has a bright, almost white glare-free screen inside a slab of black plastic, but this model has twice as many pixels as the previous version and will display laser quality text.


Mantis shrimp inspires 'stronger' body armor, athletic gear design

Mantis shrimp inspires 'stronger' body armor, athletic gear design

Washington, June 18 : Mantis shrimp has inspired the scientists to create new range of stronger aerospace and automotive frames, body armor and athletic gear like football helmet.

According to a new research paper by University of California, Riverside and Purdue University engineers, the mantis shrimp is able to repeatedly pummel the shells of prey using a hammer-like appendage that can withstand rapid-fire blows by neutralizing certain frequencies of "shear waves."

This spiral architecture is naturally designed to survive the repeated high-velocity blows.

David Kisailus said that with this novel concept, they could make composite materials able to filter certain stress waves that would otherwise damage the material.


After black, now there's a 'red burger' by Japanese Burger King

After black, now there's a 'red burger' by Japanese Burger King

Washington, June 18 : As if black wasn't a bit weird enough, Burger King Japan is now introducing a new burger in bright red color.

Called "Aka Samurai Chicken," the sandwich has red buns, bright red cheese and a red sauce made from miso and hot pepper, and will be launched on July 3, priced at 4.40 dollars, reported E! Online.

According to the Wall Street Journal, the food chain had used tomato powder in its buns and cheese to give the bright red color.

They are also offering an Aka Samurai Beef burger.

Burger King U.S. congratulated Japan on the innovation writing "Now that is a pretty, pretty burger."

However, customer reactions were a bit mixed up as while some found it "gross," others said "When are they bringing these to America I need pretty pattys in my life." (ANI)


Dropbox rolls out File Requests feature which lets anyone upload files to an account

Dropbox rolls out File Requests feature which lets anyone upload files to an acc

Washington, June 18 : Dropbox has released a new feature that will allow people without an account of their own to share files with Dropbox users.

According to the TechCrunch.com, the new feature is called the 'File Requests,' gives anyone the user ask the ability to upload files into your Dropbox account, into a folder of their choosing. Using a simple interface on Dropbox.com/requests, user can specify what file or files they are looking for and they are then provided a link they can distribute or can select the option to have Dropbox send a request email on their behalf.


CEO Evan Spiegel erases his Tweets to better explain Snapchat

CEO Evan Spiegel erases his Tweets to better explain Snapchat

Washington, June 18 - A day after Snapchat CEO Evan Spiegel starred in a low-fi video aimed at explaining his social network to old people, he has now cleared his Twitter account of every single tweet but one in order to better explain the concept behind his app that focuses on 'instant expression' and living in the present.

In the video, he had said that instant expression should tell people who you are right now, which is what the self-destructive messaging service did. He used pen and paper to explain the concept to people that stressed on the idea of living in the present, reports The Verge.


'Bashful' black hole in neighboring galaxy revealed

'Bashful' black hole in neighboring galaxy revealed

Washington, Jun 18 : Astronomers have detected what they believe is the long-sought radio emission coming from a supermassive black hole at the center of one of our closest neighboring galaxies, using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA).

The elliptical galaxy, called Messier 32 (M32), with little star formation is a satellite of the Andromeda Galaxy, our own Milky Way's giant neighbor. About 2.5 million light-years from Earth, M32 is much smaller than either the Milky Way or Andromeda.

Supermassive black holes are found at the cores of most galaxies, and as those black holes draw in matter from their surroundings, jets of material propelled to speeds close to that of light by the black holes often generate radio waves detectable with radio telescopes.


White gunman kills nine in South Carolina's African-American church

White gunman kills nine in South Carolina's African-American church

Washington, June 18 - At least nine people have been killed in a gun attack at a historic African-American church in Charleston, South Carolina.

Reports state that a white gunman entered the church and opened fire during a Bible study class.

The shooting took place on Wednesday evening and the attacker is still absconding, reported the CNN.

Noting that the killing could have been a hate crime, Mayor Joe Riley said that there couldn't have been any other reason for someone to walk into a church and shoot people who were praying. (ANI)


Here's when 'yes' should mean 'no' and 'no' 'yes'

Here's when 'yes' should mean 'no' and 'no' 'yes'

Washington, Jun 18 - Researchers have explained what we don't understand about the words "yes" and "no," which may seem like two of the easiest expressions to understand in any language, but they aren't.

Two linguists examine the workings of "yes" and "no" and show that understanding them leads to new insights concerning the understanding of questions and statements more generally.

Floris Roelofsen (University of Amsterdam) and Donka F. Farkas (UC - Santa Cruz) provide a comprehensive account of "polarity particles," as these words are called, across languages, and explain the intricate pattern of their distribution.


Humans, like pigeons, use 3-D sense of smell as 'radar'

Humans, like pigeons, use 3-D sense of smell as 'radar'

Washington, June 18 - Humans too, like homing pigeons, navigate but through their sense of smell.

New research from the University of California, Berkeley, shows that while humans may lack the scent-tracking sophistication of a search-and-rescue dog, we can sniff our way, blindfolded, toward a location whose scent we've smelled only once before.

This is the first time smell-based navigation has been field-tested on humans, and the results evoke a GPS-like superpower one could call an "olfactory positioning system."


Here's why our moon is engulfed in permanent, lopsided dust cloud

Here's why our moon is engulfed in permanent, lopsided dust cloud

Washington, Jun 18 - New research shows that moon is engulfed in a permanent but lopsided dust cloud that increases in density when annual events like the Geminids spew shooting stars

Hints of the moon's halo date back to the late 1960s and NASA's Apollo program, but this permanent veil of dust was first characterized in 2014 with the help of data from NASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer
(LADEE) spacecraft.

And now University of Colorado Boulder scientists say that the cloud, composed primarily of tiny grains kicked up from the lunar surface by the impact of interplanetary dust particles, increases in density whenever meteor showers and other celestial events boost the volume of the particles striking the moon.


Hong Kong lawmakers snub Beijing-backed electoral reform

Hong Kong lawmakers snub Beijing-backed electoral reform

Washington, June 18 - Hong Kong's legislature has reportedly rejected the Beijing-backed electoral reform package, which would have allowed the region to elect its leader, as long as the candidates contesting the election were vetted by Beijing.

The bill was rejected by 28 out of 37 lawmakers in a vote on Thursday, reported the CNN.

The proposal had touched off massive protests by pro-democracy activists in September last year that lasted for several months. (ANI)


Earth-like planet models built in hunt for alien life

Earth-like planet models built in hunt for alien life

Washington, Jun 18 - In their hunt for alien life, astronomers have built an array of Earth-like planet models that examine how ultraviolet radiation from other planets' nearby suns may affect those world.

Researcher Lisa Kaltenegger said that depending on the intensity, ultraviolet radiation can be both useful and harmful to the origin of life and added that they are trying to ascertain how much radiation other young Earths would get and what that could mean for the possibility for life.


Newly found brightest galaxy yet can be harbouring 1st generation stars

Newly found brightest galaxy yet can be harbouring 1st generation stars

Washington, Jun 18 - Astronomers have discovered the brightest galaxy yet found in the early Universe and found strong evidence that examples of the first generation of stars lurk within it.

The team, led by David Sobral from the Institute of Astrophysics and Space Sciences, the Faculty of Sciences of the University of Lisbon in Portugal, and Leiden Observatory in the Netherlands, peered back into the ancient Universe, to the reionization period approximately 800 million years after the Big Bang.

The newly found galaxy, named CR7, is three times brighter than the brightest distant galaxy known up to now.


Manmade pollution could be 400,000 yrs old

Manmade pollution could be 400,000 yrs old

Washington, June 18 - Man could have started polluting around 400,000 years ago, suggests a new study.

Tel Aviv University researchers, in collaboration with scholars from Spain, the U. K. and Australia, have uncovered evidence of food and potential respiratory irritants entrapped in the dental calculus of 400,000-year-old teeth at Qesem Cave near Tel Aviv, the site of many major discoveries from the late Lower Paleolithic period.

The research led by Prof. Karen Hardy of ICREA at the Universitat Autonoma, Barcelona, Spain, provides direct evidence of what early Palaeolithic people ate and the quality of the air they breathed inside Qesem Cave.


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