Health News

Pregnancy complications may raise heart disease risk in later life

Pregnancy complications may raise heart disease risk in later life Washington, Feb 18 : Women who experienced complications during pregnancy, like high blood pressure-related disorders or diabetes, may have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease later in life, say researchers.

"We wanted to learn about possible explanations as to why women with pregnancy complications tend to have more heart disease later in life," said Abigail Fraser, M. P. H., Ph. D., School of Social and Community Medicine at the University of Bristol, United Kingdom.


Maternal depression can delay infant language development

Maternal depression can delay infant language development Washington, Feb 18 : Environmental influences such as maternal depression or a bilingual upbringing can affect the timing of language development in babies, according to a new study.

The finding from the University of British Columbia is among the first to explore the impacts of maternal mental health and antidepressant exposure on the mechanics of early language acquisition.

The preliminary findings provide important new insights into early childhood development and mother's mental health and will inform new approaches to infant language acquisition, the researchers say.


Men stress about work while women worry about life

Men stress about work while women worry about life Washington, Feb 18 : While personal matters like family problems and living situations might cause the most stress for women, on-the-job issues cause men the maximum anxiety, a new study has found.

The research, based on surveys of more than 1,200 U. S. residents, by Polaris Marketing Research regarding sources of stress revealed that men were more likely to say work issues were causing them angst, while women were significantly more likely to cite financial issues, lack of time, family problems, living situation and relationship issues.


South Asians with coronary disease experience lower quality of life

South Asians with coronary disease experience lower quality of lifeWashington, Feb 16 : A new study in Canada has discovered that South Asians who live in Alberta with coronary disease experience a lower quality of life.

This adds to prior data that this group lives with more severe disease.

Using the APPROACH registry, which captures information about all patients who undergo a coronary angiogram in Alberta, Kevin Bainey of the Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry and his team analyzed data about quality of life and health status of this population.


Dogs encourage ‘low-risk’ exercise in pregnant women

Dogs encourage ‘low-risk’ exercise in pregnant womenWashington, Feb 16 : Pregnant women who owned dogs are approximately 50 percent more likely to achieve the recommended 30 minutes of exercise a day through high levels of brisk walking than those without dogs, according to a new study.

Scientists suggest that as it is a low-risk exercise, walking a dog could form part of a broader strategy to improve the health of pregnant women.

The study of more than 11,000 pregnant women was conducted by the University of Liverpool in partnership with Mars Petcare.


Diabetes may originate in your gut

Diabetes may originate in your gutWashington, Feb 16 : Scientists have suggested that problems controlling blood sugar - the hallmark of diabetes - may begin in the intestines.

The finding may upend long-held theories about the causes of the disease. Because insulin is produced in the pancreas and sugar is stored in the liver, many scientists have looked to those organs for the underlying causes of diabetes.

In the new research, scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis studied mice that are unable to make fatty acid synthase (FAS) in the intestine.


Trojan horse bacteria employ nanobodies to conquer sleeping sickness

Trojan horse bacteria employ nanobodies to conquer sleeping sickness Washington, Feb 15 : In a new study related to sleeping sickness, researchers have used a bacteria, which naturally lives in the tsetse fly, to release antibody fragments against the trypanosome.

These antibodies, which bind to the surface of the parasite, are the first stage in producing targeted nanobodies, which could kill, or block, trypanosome development.

Sleeping sickness, caused by the trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei, is transmitted to humans and animals via the bite of the tsetse fly.


Our bodies may influence how we think

Our bodies may influence how we think Washington, Feb 15 : We like to consider ourselves to be rational creatures, who absorb information, weigh it carefully, and make thoughtful decisions.

But, as it turns out, we're kidding ourselves. Over the past few decades, scientists have shown there are many different internal and external factors influencing how we think, feel, communicate, and make decisions at any given moment.

One particularly powerful influence may be our own bodies, according to a new research.


Breast implants top list of most common plastic surgeries

Breast implants top list of most common plastic surgeries Washington, Feb 15 : Breast augmentations are the most common form of plastic surgery in America, plastic surgeons say.

According to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, the number of women who are getting breast implants has increased from last year.

In 2011, 307,180 women nationwide underwent a breast augmentation procedure while 296, 203 women had the same surgery in 2010.

Loyola University Health System plastic surgeons have also revealed similar trends in their practice.


Brain rehearsal time ensures ‘solidified’ memories

Brain rehearsal time ensures ‘solidified’ memories Washington, Feb 15 : The brain's ability to rehearse or repeat electrical impulses may be extremely essential in order to make a newly acquired memory more permanent, researchers say.

University of Alberta psychology professor Clayton Dickson likened the process to someone trying to permanently memorize a phone number.

"We repeat the number several times to ourselves, so hopefully we can automatically recall it when needed."


New vaccine offers hope for total joint replacement patients

New vaccine offers hope for total joint replacement patients Washington, Feb 15 : Methicillin resistant staph aureus (MRSA) infections are antibiotic-resistant and can cause a innumerable problems like bone erosion, or osteomyelitis, which curtail the effective life of an implant and significantly hampers replacement of that implant.

MRSA can result in prolonged disability, amputation and even death.

Although only 2 percent of the American population that undergo total joint replacement surgery will suffer an infection, half of those infections are from MRSA.

The results of a MRSA infection after a total joint replacement can be devastating.


Sleep disruption may affect your memory later on

Sleep disruption may affect your memory later onWashington, Feb 15 : A new study has found that people who slept "less efficiently" were more likely to have the markers of early stage Alzheimer's disease than those who have stable sleeping patter patterns.

"Disrupted sleep appears to be associated with the build-up of amyloid plaques, a hallmark marker of Alzheimer's disease, in the brains of people without memory problems," said study author Yo-El Ju, MD, with Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and a member of the American Academy of Neurology.


Just 7 days of exposure to air pollution may up heart attack risk

Just 7 days of exposure to air pollution may up heart attack risk Washington, Feb 15 : Short-term exposure (for up to 7 days) to all major air pollutants, with the exception of ozone, may increase risk of heart attack, researchers have warned.

The potentially harmful effect of episodes of high air pollution on health has been suspected for more than 50 years.

Hazrije Mustafic, M. D., M. P. H., of the University Paris Descartes, INSERM Unit 970, Paris, and colleagues conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to examine the association between short-term exposure to air pollutants and the risk of heart attack, and to quantify these associations.


Antibiotics ‘no better than placebo’ for sinus infections

Antibiotics ‘no better than placebo’ for sinus infections Washington, Feb 15 : Antibiotics are no better than an inactive placebo in improving symptoms for sinusitis, a new study has suggested.

Investigators at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis say, in fact, most people get better on their own without using antibiotics.

"Patients don't get better faster or have fewer symptoms when they get antibiotics," said Jay F. Piccirillo, MD, professor of otolaryngology and the study's senior author.

"Our results show that antibiotics aren't necessary for a basic sinus infection - most people get better on their own," he stated.


Sex makes malaria parasite go ‘bananas’

Sex makes malaria parasite go ‘bananas’ Washington, Feb 15 : The malaria parasite (Plasmodium falciparum) changes into a banana shape before sexual reproduction, an Australian research team has found.

The finding could provide targets for vaccine or drug development and may explain how the parasite evades the human immune system.

The team was led by Dr Matthew Dixon and PhD student Megan Dearnley from the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Institute at the University of Melbourne.

Dr Dixon said the new study solves a 130-year old mystery, revealing how the most deadly of human malaria parasites, Plasmodium falciparum performs its shape-shifting.


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