Health News

Parents want children of own gender to carry on legacy

Parents want children of own gender to carry on legacyWashington, Dec 20 : A new study has revealed the gender bias of prospective parents with men longing for boys while women wish for girls.

“Gender neutrality - a lack of preference - is now a standard cultural norm embraced within most wealthy developed countries like Canada,” said Lonnie Aarssen, a Queen University’s biology professor and co-author of the study.

However, his results reveal a strong gender bias, despite the researchers’ prediction that they would find evidence of a well-established contemporary culture of gender neutrality.


Why eating less helps brain to stay young

 Why eating less helps brain to stay young Washington, Dec 20 : Eating less activates a molecule for ‘brain longevity’ and thus helps the brain stay young, a new study has revealed.

Many studies suggest that obesity is bad for our brain, slows it down, causes early brain aging, making it susceptible to diseases typical of older people as the Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. In contrast, caloric restriction keeps the brain young.


High BP in middle age could predict heart attack or stroke

High BP in middle age could predict heart attack or stroke Washington, Dec 20 : Men and women who developed high blood pressure in their middle age or who started out with high blood pressure have an estimated 30 percent increased risk of having a heart attack or stroke compared to those who kept their blood pressure low, according to a new study.

The new Northwestern Medicine research offers a new understanding on the importance of maintaining low blood pressure early in middle age to prevent heart disease later in life.

Previous estimates of a person’s risk of cardiovascular disease were based on a single blood pressure measurement.


Acupuncture could help cure chronic stress

Acupuncture could help cure chronic stress Washington, Dec 20 : Acupuncture, the ancient Chinese therapy, has been found to significantly reduce levels of a protein linked to chronic stress.

Although the study was done in rats, researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center (GUMC) suggest the findings could help explain why many users of the therapy report health benefits.

The researchers say that if their findings were replicated in human studies, acupuncture would offer a proven therapy for stress, which is often difficult to treat.


Cardiac resynchronisation therapy cuts heart failure mortality rates

Cardiac resynchronisation therapy cuts heart failure mortality ratesWashington, Dec 19 : Cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) does indeed reduce rates of death and re-hospitalisation among heart failure patients, a new study has suggested.

The European CRT Survey found that indeed, at one-year follow-up most patients who had received a CRT device considered their symptoms were better than their pre-implant assessment.

The survey - a joint initiative of the Heart Failure Association and European Heart Rhythm Association of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) - gathered information on more than 2000 patients at 141 centres in 13 European countries.


Artificial intestines come closer to reality

Artificial intestines come closer to realityWashington, Dec 17 : A new artificial intestine developed in a laboratory using collagen and stem cells, is expected to soon help treat people suffering from acute bowel disorders.

A team of researchers has created a tiny artificial intestine in the lab and they aim at scaling the tube up within three years so that it can be tested in human trials.

"We're going to be taking these and inserting them into animals to see if it actually works," Discovery News quoted John March, an assistant professor of biological and environmental engineering at Cornell University who developed the artificial intestine structure as saying.


Key interventions to reduce maternal, newborn and child deaths identified

Key interventions to reduce maternal, newborn and child deaths identifiedWashington, Dec 17 : A three-year study has identified key interventions to reduce maternal, newborn and chills deaths.

According to the massive global study, some 56 evidence-based interventions will sharply reduce the 358,000 women who still die each year during pregnancy and childbirth and the 7.6 million children who die before the age of 5.


Soon, micro-robots in blood stream to destroy tumours, blood clots

Soon, micro-robots in blood stream to destroy tumours, blood clots Washington, Dec 17 : A new type of therapeutic technology shows promise to treat diseases by steering microscopic-scale medical robots into the bloodstream, a new study has revealed.

Scientists believe the microbots, which are less than one millimeter in size, might someday be able to travel throughout the human bloodstream to deliver drugs to specific targets or seek and wipe out tumours, blood clots, and infections that are otherwise not easily accessible.


Radiation therapy to become twice more effective and safe

Radiation therapy to become twice more effective and safe Washington, Dec 17 : Radiation therapy may soon have fewer side effects and doubled efficiency, a new study has revealed.

Georgia Health Sciences University scientists have devised a way to reduce lung cancer cells’ ability to repair the lethal double-strand DNA breaks caused by radiation therapy.

“Radiation is a great therapy – the problem is the side effects,” said Dr. William S. Dynan, biochemist and Associate Director of Research and Chief, Nanomedicine and Gene Regulation at the GHSU Institute of Molecular Medicine and Genetics.


Calorie info can prompt teens to choose water over sugary drinks

Calorie info can prompt teens to choose water over sugary drinks Washington, Dec 16 : Providing easily understandable caloric information about sugar-sweetened beverages such as soda and fruit juice can trigger teens to opt for water over sugary drinks, a new study has revealed.

The researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health collected data for 1,600 beverage sales to black adolescents, aged 12-18 years, including 400 during a baseline period and 400 for each of the 3 caloric-condition interventions.


Walk faster when you are 70 to evade Grim Reaper!

Walk faster when you are 70 to evade Grim Reaper!Washington, Dec 16 (ANI): A study has found that men who are aged 70 and older can escape the Grim Reaper by walking at speeds of at least 3 miles (5km) an hour.

The researchers say that for the first time they have estimated the speed at which the Grim Reaper usually walked: about 1.8 miles per hour. He never walked faster than 3 miles per hour.

The Grim Reaper is a well-known mythological and literary figure who personifies death.


Genetic blueprint of medicinal plants captured

Genetic blueprint of medicinal plants captured Washington, Dec 16 : Scientists are set to release all the data they have so far on the genetic blueprint of medicinal plants and what beneficial properties are encoded by the genes identified.

The resources follow a 6 million dollars initiative to study how plant genes contribute to producing various chemical compounds, some of which are medicinally important.


Now, breath test can detect, characterize lung cancer

Now, breath test can detect, characterize lung cancer Washington, Dec 16 : A new breath test will now help in identifying and differentiating between the types of lung cancer in humans with high accuracy, a new study has suggested.

Metabolomx, a diagnostic company focused on the detection of the metabolomics signature of cancer from exhaled breath.

This seminal study, conducted at the Cleveland Clinic and led by Dr. Peter Mazzone, used Metabolomx’ first-generation colorimetric sensor array, and reported accuracy exceeding 80 percent in lung cancer detection, comparable to computerized tomography (CT) scan.


US limits use of chimpanzees in medical research

US limits use of chimpanzees in medical researchWashington, Dec 16 : The US announced Thursday that it will sharply restrict the use of chimpanzees in future publicly funded invasive medical research and plans to review current projects involving chimps.

Chimpanzees' similarity with people "demands special consideration and respect", the National Institutes of Health director, Francis Collins, said, while pointing to breakthroughs that came from studies using animals.

A review carried out by the Institute of Medicine at the NIH's request concluded that chimps are no longer needed for biomedical research.


New Alzheimer’s drug may help prevent disease progression

 New Alzheimer’s drug may help prevent disease progressionWashington, Dec 15 : A new drug candidate that may be the first capable of halting the devastating mental decline of Alzheimer’s disease has been developed by scientists.

The disease causes a steady, irreversible decline in brain function, erasing a person’s memory and ability to think clearly until they are unable to perform simple tasks such as eating and talking, and it is ultimately fatal.


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