Health News

2 common sweeteners in diets differ in their effects on body

2 common sweeteners in diets differ in their effects on bodyWashington, Jan 24 :High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) and table sugar (sucrose), which are thought to have nearly identical effects on the body, actually have slight differences between them, researchers say.

With growing concern that excessive levels of fructose may pose a great health risk - causing high blood pressure, kidney disease and diabetes - researchers at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, along with their colleagues at the University of Florida, set out to see if two common sweeteners in western diets differ in their effects on the body in the first few hours after ingestion.


Many patients don’t quit smoking even after cancer diagnosis

Many patients don’t quit smoking even after cancer diagnosisWashington, Jan 23 : A substantial number of lung and colorectal cancer patients continue to smoke after being diagnosed, a new study has revealed.

When a patient receives a cancer diagnosis, the main focus is to treat the disease. But stopping smoking after a cancer diagnosis is also important because continuing to smoke can negatively affect patients' responses to treatments, their subsequent cancer risk, and, potentially, their survival.


Mouth spray developed from marijuana to treat severe cancer pain

 Mouth spray developed from marijuana to treat severe cancer pain Washington, Jan 23 : A British pharmaceutical company has developed a mouth spray from key ingredients of marijuana to treat severe cancer pain.

GW Pharmaceuticals has asked the Food and Drug Administration to approve Sativex, the world's first prescription drug developed from marijuana's two best known psychoactive ingredients, Delta-9 THC and cannabinoids.

The company is in advanced clinical trials to the get the spray approved in the United States as treatment for severe cancer pain, ABC news reported.


Hormones alone ‘not to blame for women’s mood swings’

 Hormones alone ‘not to blame for women’s mood swings’ Washington, Jan 23 : Women's emotional responses can vary significantly premenstrually. They may become depressed or grumpy during menstruation or the premenstrual phase, known as premenstrual syndrome (PMS).

Roughly 75 percent of reproductive-age women report premenstrual mood swings or physical discomfort.

Brain scans show a significant increase in activity in the medial orbitofrontal cortex related to emotional processing premenstrually, even if women's emotional responses do not vary significantly.


Fruit and veggies may help ward off colon cancer

Fruit and veggies may help ward off colon cancer Washington, Jan 23 : A vital nutrient found in fruits and vegetables could help protect against colon cancer, which is the second most frequent cause of cancer-related deaths in the western world.

Luteolin is a flavonoid commonly found in fruit and vegetables. This compound has been shown in laboratory conditions to have anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-cancer properties but results from epidemiological studies have been less certain.

New research showed that luteolin is able to inhibit the activity of cell signaling pathways (IGF and PI3K) important for the growth of cancer in colon cancer cells.


Origins of our earliest oxygen-breathing ancestors clarified

Washington, Jan 23 : Scientists have shed light on the crystal structure of quinol dependent nitric oxide reductase (qNOR), a bacterial enzyme that offers clues on the origins of our earliest oxygen-breathing ancestors.

In addition to their importance to fundamental science, the findings provide key insights into the production of nitrogen oxide, an ozone-depleting and greenhouse gas hundreds of times more potent than carbon dioxide.

As the central process by which cells capture and store the chemical energy they need to survive, cellular respiration is essential to all life on this planet.


Sticking to values activates 'ethics' part of brain

Sticking to values activates 'ethics' part of brainWashington, Jan 23 - Sticking to values even in the face of temptations, including money, activates an area of the brain tied with rules-based, ethical thought processes.

Simply told, decision-making over 'sacred values' prompts our brains to act in a specific way, says an Emory University neuro-imaging study.


Vaccines to boost immunity where it counts

Vaccines to boost immunity where it countsWashington, Jan 23 - Researchers have created synthetic nanoparticles that greatly bolster vaccine responses by targeting lymph nodes, where most immune reaction occurs.

Currently, all other adjuvants (compounds added to boost the shots) are believed to bolster immunity at the site where the vaccine is injected rather than going to the lymph nodes. The mice based study shows the delivery path can be directed to the lymph nodes.


Poorer smokers find it toughest to kick the butt

Poorer smokers find it toughest to kick the butt Washington, Jan 21 : Quitting smoking is a tougher job for people with lower socioeconomic status (SES) than their counterparts, who have greater financial and social status, a new study has revealed.

Christine Sheffer, associate medical professor at CCNY's Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education, tracked smokers from different socioeconomic backgrounds after they had completed a statewide smoking cessation program in Arkansas.


Potential therapeutic approach to fighting infection found

Washington, Jan 21 : Scientists have discovered a new type of treatment to stimulate the function of immune system and fight infection.

Our bodies are subject to attack by many different infectious particles (bacteria, viruses, etc.), which surround us in our everyday environment.

Various immune cells are activated to fight off these attacks: the first response is from the innate immune cells1, which gradually give way to the memory B and T lymphocytes of the adaptive immune system.

The Natural Killer (NK) cells are a part of this first line of defence of the organism. They can selectively kill tumour cells or cells infected by microbes whilst secreting chemical messengers known as cytokines, which stimulate and direct the response of the B and T lymphocytes.


Indian-origin scientists lead fundamental malaria discovery

Indian-origin scientists lead fundamental malaria discovery Washington, Jan 21 : A team led by Indian-origin scientists has made a fundamental discovery in understanding how malaria parasites cause the deadly disease.

The researchers led by Kasturi Haldar and Souvik Bhattacharjee of the University of Notre Dame's Center for Rare and Neglected Diseases revealed how parasites target proteins to the surface of the red blood cell that enables sticking to and blocking blood vessels.

Strategies that prevent this host-targeting process will block disease.


Personal care products chemical may up childhood obesity rates

Personal care products chemical may up childhood obesity rates Washington, Jan 21 : Exposure to chemical group phthalates, which are commonly used in plastic flooring and wall coverings, food processing materials, medical devices, and personal-care products, could play a role in rising childhood obesity rates, a new study has revealed.

Phthalates are man-made, endocrine-disrupting chemicals that can mimic the body's natural hormones.

The study by Researchers from the Children's Environmental Health Center at The Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York was the first to examine the relationship between phthalate exposure and measurements used to identify obesity in children.


Young breast cancer survivors face array of quality of life challenges

Young breast cancer survivors face array of quality of life challenges Washington, Jan 21 : While breast cancer survival rates for younger women has improved in the past two decades but the cancer treatments, despite their effectiveness, can dramatically affect their health-related quality of life (QOL) and other health outcomes, researchers say.

Younger women with breast cancer experience a decrease in their QOL, associated with increased psychological distress, weight gain, a decline in their physical activity, infertility and early onset menopause.


New imaging platform tells when cancer cells turn deadly for the body

New imaging platform tells when cancer cells turn deadly for the bodyWashington, Jan 20 : A new imaging platform developed by researchers provides an insight into the exact moment when cancer cells turn aggressive and start to spread, turning deadly for the body.

Certain proteins, such as E-cadherin, are important for the maintenance of normal tissue structure. When tumors become more aggressive, they often lose E-cadherin, resulting in dramatic changes to their structure, function and ability to spread.


Low birth weight ‘may affect development of autism’

Washington, Jan 20 : Low birth weight is an important environmental factor contributing to the risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), a new study has found.

Although the genetic basis of autism is now well established, a growing body of research also suggests that environmental factors may play a role in this serious developmental disorder affecting nearly one in 100 children.

"Our study of discordant twins -- twin pairs in which only one twin was affected by ASD -- found birth weight to be a very strong predictor of autism spectrum disorder," Molly Losh, the lead author of the study from Northwestern University, said.

Prior twin studies have shown that when one identical twin had ASD, the other twin was much more likely to have ASD than not.


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