Health News

Video-based home exercise can reduce osteoarthritis pain and improve mobility

Video-based home exercise can reduce osteoarthritis pain and improve mobilityWashington, Feb 9 : Video-based home exercise programs can enhance adherence to a prescribed exercise program, can reduce pain, improve physical function, and improve life quality in patients living with knee osteoarthritis, researchers say.

The benefits of exercise in minimizing pain and improving mobility for individuals living with osteoarthritis has been well documented.

In a new study, 107 individuals with diagnosed osteoarthritis in the knee were randomized to either a DVD-based exercise group, or a control group.


Stimulating key site in brain boosts memory

Stimulating key site in brain boosts memory Washington, Feb 9 : UCLA neuroscientists have found that they can strengthen memory in human patients by stimulating a critical junction in the brain.

The finding could lead to a new method for boosting memory in patients with early Alzheimer''s disease.

The UCLA team focused on a brain site called the entorhinal cortex. Considered the doorway to the hippocampus, which helps form and store memories, the entorhinal cortex plays a crucial role in transforming daily experience into lasting memories.


Breastfeeding for at least 6 months can cut risk of childhood obesity

Breastfeeding for at least 6 months can cut risk of childhood obesity Washington, Feb 9 : Children of diabetic mothers have a greater risk of childhood obesity, but breastfeeding for at least six months can reduce this threat, a new study has suggested.

Epidemiologist Tessa Crume, Ph. D., MSPH, and fellow researchers tracked 94 children of diabetic pregnancies and 399 of non-diabetic pregnancies from birth to age 13.

They evaluated the influence of breastfeeding on the growth of body mass index (BMI), an indicator of childhood obesity.

"There are critical perinatal periods for defining obesity risk, pregnancy and early infant life," Crume said.


Anti-obesity drugs with modified lifestyle help weight loss

Anti-obesity drugs with modified lifestyle help weight loss Washington, Feb 9 : Researchers including one of an Indian origin have found that anti-obesity drugs coupled with lifestyle advice are effective in reducing weight and body mass index.

A study led by the University of Leicester looks at the effectiveness of anti -obesity drugs and a modified lifestyle on weight loss and BMI.

The review was based on 94 studies including over 24,000 individuals and assessed how effective the drugs were in terms of weight loss and body mass index at 3, 6 and 12 months.

Two of the included drugs (sibutramine and rimonbant) were withdrawn from use during the review due to possible side effects.


Zinc supplements ‘may slash death risk among kids with pneumonia’

Zinc supplements ‘may slash death risk among kids with pneumonia’ Washington, Feb 8 : Scientists have shown how zinc supplements drastically improve children's chances of surviving respiratory tract infections including pneumonia.

The study also claims that the increase in survival due to zinc on top of antibiotics, was even greater for HIV infected children.

In a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial, 350 children, aged from six months to five years old, were treated with standard antibiotic therapy at Mulago Hospital. Half the children were given zinc and the other half a placebo.


New laser therapies ‘could make tattoo removal easier’

New laser therapies ‘could make tattoo removal easier’ Washington, Feb 8 : Dermatologists are now discovering new laser therapies for enhancing tattoo removal treatment.

Tattoos, which may affect a person's skin, can be quite difficult to treat or remove.

While lasers have been used to remove tattoos for several years, the procedure requires multiple treatment sessions (typically six to 10 treatments or more) and treatments are painful, requiring a few weeks of healing time between procedures.


Older women at highest risk of dying from breast cancer

Older women at highest risk of dying from breast cancer Washington, Feb 8 : Among postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer, increasing age is associated with a higher risk of death from breast cancer, a new study has found.

Willemien van de Water and his colleagues from the Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands, conducted a study to assess disease-specific mortality among age groups in postmenopausal patients with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer.

The study consisted of an analysis of 9,766 patients enrolled in the TEAM (Tamoxifen Exemestane Adjuvant Multinational) randomised clinical trial between January 2001 and January 2006.


Brain mechanisms ‘link foods to rising obesity rates’

Brain mechanisms ‘link foods to rising obesity rates’ Washington, Feb 8 : In a new study, scientists have shed light on the biological factors contributing to rising rates of obesity and have discussed strategies to reduce body weight.

According to the U. S. Centers for Disease Control, about one-third of U. S. adults are obese, a number that continues to climb.

"While we don't usually think of it this way, body weight is regulated. How much we weigh is influenced by a number of biological systems, and this is part of what makes it so hard for people to lose weight and keep it off," Randy Seeley from Donald C. Harrison Endowed Chair, said.


Exercise triggers cells known to be important for muscle repair

 Exercise triggers cells known to be important for muscle repair Washington, Feb 7 : Scientists have found that an adult stem cell present in muscle is responsive to exercise - a discovery that could lead to new therapeutic techniques to treat injured muscle and prevent or restore muscle loss with age.

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in skeletal muscle have been known to be important for muscle repair in response to non-physiological injury, predominantly in response to chemical injections that significantly damage muscle tissue and induce inflammation.


Combined oral contraceptive pill may ease painful periods

 Combined oral contraceptive pill may ease painful periods Washington, Feb 7 : Women who use combined oral contraceptive pill suffer less severe pain compared with women who do not use it, a new study has revealed.

Although some previous studies and anecdotal evidence have suggested that the combined oral contraceptive pill could have an impact on painful periods, a 2009 review of all the available research by the prestigious Cochrane Collaboration concluded that there was limited evidence for pain improvement.


Positive parenting helps prevent obesity in kids

Positive parenting helps prevent obesity in kidsWashington, Feb 7 - Positive parenting during the child's formative years could help prevent obesity among them.

Today, one out of five US children is obese. They are five times more likely than their peers to be obese by adolescence, facing higher risk for a range of medical, social and academic problems.

The new study, led by Laurie Miller Brotman, professor of child and adolescent psychiatry at the New York University, investigated whether early family intervention that was effective for parents of children with behaviour problems, resulted in lower rates of obesity.


‘Test and Treat’ model offers new strategy for eradicating malaria

 ‘Test and Treat’ model offers new strategy for eradicating malaria Washington, Feb 7 : As researchers work to eliminate malaria worldwide, new strategies are required to find and treat individuals with undiagnosed malaria.

The prevalence of asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic malaria can be as high as 35 percent in populations with malaria and these asymptomatic individuals can serve as a reservoir for spreading malaria even in areas where disease transmission has declined.


Metabolic ‘breathalyzer’ offers hope of early disease detection

Metabolic ‘breathalyzer’ offers hope of early disease detection Washington, Feb 7 : The future of disease diagnosis may lie in a "breathalyser"- a non-invasive and sensitive technology, which may help in early detection and diagnosis of the disease.

New research demonstrates a simple but sensitive method that can distinguish normal and disease-state glucose metabolism by a quick assay of blood or exhaled air.

Many diseases, including diabetes, cancer, and infections, alter the body's metabolism in distinctive ways. The new work shows that these biochemical changes can be detected much sooner than typical symptoms would appear - even within a few hours.


It’s official! Smoking makes men stupid

It’s official! Smoking makes men stupid Washington, Feb 7 : Smoking may accelerate cognitive decline in men, researchers have warned.

Smoking is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for dementia in the elderly and the number of dementia cases worldwide, estimated at 36 million in 2010, is on the rise and is projected to double every 20 years, the researchers wrote in their study background.

Severine Sabia, Ph. D., of University College London, and colleagues used the Whitehall II cohort study, which is based on employees of the British Civil Service.


Girls born to older mums likelier to have breast cancer

Girls born to older mums likelier to have breast cancer Washington, Feb 7 : Women born to mothers aged over 39 years and women who were taller and thinner than the average girl prior to puberty have a higher risk of developing breast cancer.

These are the results of a new study that analyses the influence that certain birth and infancy characteristics have on mammographic density - an important indicator of breast cancer risk.

Although the role that mammographic density plays in breast cancer has been known for years, researchers at the Carlos III Health Institute (ISCIII) have now headed a study that explores the influence of certain characteristics on mammographic density.


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