Health News

Changes in cerebrospinal fluid levels can predict risk of Alzheimer’s

 Changes in cerebrospinal fluid levels can predict risk of Alzheimer’s Washington, Jan 3 : Changes seen in cerebrospinal fluid levels can help identify individuals at high risk for future Alzheimer disease (AD) at least five to 10 years before conversion to dementia," according to scientists.

They found that cerebrospinal fluid levels of Aß42 appear to be decreased at least five to 10 years before some patients with mild cognitive impairment develop AD dementia whereas other spinal fluid levels seem to be later markers of disease.

The researchers suggested that disease-modifying therapies, such as immunotherapy, are more likely to be successful if started in the early stages of the disease.


Fat hormone may increase dementia and Alzheimer’s risk in women

 Fat hormone may increase dementia and Alzheimer’s risk in women Washington, Jan 3 : A hormone found in body fat may contribute towards increased risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD) in women, a new study has suggested.

AD is the most common form of dementia. According to the authors, the data suggest an association between insulin resistance and inflammation, hallmarks for type 2 diabetes, and development of dementia.

"An additional potential factor that may contribute to the onset of AD and all-cause dementia is adiponectin," the authors said.


Diabetes during pregnancy and poverty may up kid’s ADHD risk

 Diabetes during pregnancy and poverty may up kid’s ADHD risk Washington, Jan 3 : Moms who develop diabetes during pregnancy and are from a poor social background are more likely to have kids with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a new study has revealed.

To examine the association of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and low socioeconomic status with neurodevelopment and ADHD outcomes, Yoko Nomura, M. D., Ph. D., of Queens College, City University of New York, Flushing, and colleagues, compared offspring of mothers with and without GDM in an economically diverse sample.


Marijuana affects brain functioning during visual stimuli

 Marijuana affects brain functioning during visual stimuli Washington, Jan 3 : An Indian origin scientist and his team have found that different ingredients in marijuana appear to affect regions of the brain differently during brain processing functions involving responses to certain visual stimuli and tasks.

Sagnik Bhattacharyya, M. B. B. S., M. D., Ph. D, at the Institute of Psychiatry, King's College in London, and colleagues studied 15 healthy men, who were occasional marijuana users, to examine the effects of
9-tetrahydrocannabinol (9-THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) on regional brain function during salience processing, which is how people perceive things around them.


Hepatitis C virus hijacks liver microRNAs to survive

Hepatitis C virus hijacks liver microRNAs to survive Washington, Jan 3 : A new study has discovered how hepatitis C virus survives in the liver - helping medical scientists understand why a new antiviral drug appears to be effective against the virus.

Scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, working with colleagues from the University of Colorado, have found for the first time how the hepatitis C virus hijacked a small RNA molecule that regulates gene expression in human liver cells to ensure its own survival.


Outside temperatures, sun exposure and gender play role in glaucoma risk

Outside temperatures, sun exposure and gender play role in glaucoma risk Washington, Jan 2 : Age, gender and where you live may determine glaucoma risk, a new study has revealed.

Exfoliation syndrome (ES) is an eye condition that is a leading cause of secondary open-angle glaucoma and increased risk of cataract as well as cataract surgery complications.

"Although many studies from around the world have reported on the burden of the disease, some aspects of the basic descriptive epidemiologic features, which may help shed light on the cause, are inconsistent," said Louis Pasquale, M. D., study co-author and director of Massachusetts Eye and Ear's Glaucoma Center of Excellence.


Poor sleep aggravates health and behaviour problems in young diabetics

Poor sleep aggravates health and behaviour problems in young diabeticsWashington, Jan 2 : Young diabetics struggling to get a good night's sleep have worse control of their blood sugar, perform poorly in school and behave badly, a new study has found.

According to Michelle Perfect and her colleagues, lighter sleep and breathing problems lead to trouble controlling blood sugar, despite adherence to diabetic health guidelines

"Despite adhering to recommendations for good diabetic health, many youth with Type 1 diabetes have difficulty maintaining control of their blood sugars," Perfect, principal investigator of the study, said.


Promising new drug targets against kidney cancer identified

Promising new drug targets against kidney cancer identifiedWashington, Dec 30 : Scientists have laid the foundation of completely understanding the intricacies of distinct kidney cancer subtypes, which could lead to better treatments for the disease.

Van Andel Research Institute scientists conducted two studies. In one study led by Kyle Furge, Ph. D. and Aikseng Ooi, Ph. D., researchers provide a more complete understanding of the biology of Type 2 papillary renal cell carcinoma (PRCC2), an aggressive type of kidney cancer with no effective treatment, which lays the foundation for the development of effective treatment strategies.


Beer drinkers likelier to be in drunk driving deaths

 Beer drinkers likelier to be in drunk driving deathsWashington, Dec 31 : Beer drinkers are most likely to drive drunk and get involved in driving fatalities than wine or scotch drinkers, a new study has found.

In fact, the study found that states with higher wine consumption actually have fewer drunk driving deaths, Discovery News reported.

"Beer has the strongest link to traffic fatalities, then spirits, while wine has a negative impact on traffic fatalities," said Bradley Rickard, assistant professor of economics and applied management at Cornell University.


US rejects Chavez’s remark blaming country for cancer- stricken Latin America leaders

 US rejects Chavez’s remark blaming country for cancer- stricken Latin America leadersWashington, Dec 30 : The US has slammed Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez's comments in which he had said the former may be responsible for cancers affecting Latin American leaders.

US State Department spokeswoman Victoria Nuland said the comments were "horrific and reprehensible", and did not deserve a further response, The BBC reports.

Chavez had said it was "very strange" that he and other leftist leaders were suffering from cancer after Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner was diagnosed with the disease.


Gene that may up risk of hereditary pancreatic cancer identified

Washington, Dec 30 : Scientists have discovered that mutations in the ATM gene may increase the hereditary risk for pancreatic cancer.

Pancreatic cancer is one of the most morbid cancers, with less than 5 percent of those diagnosed with the disease surviving to five years.

Approximately 10 percent of patients come from families with multiple cases of pancreatic cancer.


Meditation improves breast cancer survivors’ emotional and physical well-being

 Meditation improves breast cancer survivors’ emotional and physical well-being Washington, Dec 30 : Mindfulness-based meditation plays a vital role in improving breast cancer survivors' health challenges, which they face after treatments, a new study has revealed.

Yaowarat Matchim, a former nursing doctoral student; Jane Armer, professor of nursing and Bob Stewart, professor emeritus of education and adjunct faculty in nursing, found that breast cancer survivors' health improved after they learned Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR), a type of mindfulness training that incorporates meditation, yoga and physical awareness.


Promising new drug targets against kidney cancer identified

Washington, Dec 30 : Scientists have laid the foundation of completely understanding the intricacies of distinct kidney cancer subtypes, which could lead to better treatments for the disease.

Van Andel Research Institute scientists conducted two studies. In one study led by Kyle Furge, Ph. D. and Aikseng Ooi, Ph. D., researchers provide a more complete understanding of the biology of Type 2 papillary renal cell carcinoma (PRCC2), an aggressive type of kidney cancer with no effective treatment, which lays the foundation for the development of effective treatment strategies.

Despite obvious morphological, genetic, and clinical differences, hereditary PRCC2 is thought to share similar pathway deregulation due to genetic mutation with its counterpart, clear cell renal cell carcinoma


Gene that increases pancreatic cancer risk identified

Gene that increases pancreatic cancer risk identifiedWashington, Dec 30 : A gene that increases the risk of pancreatic cancer has been identified, experts say.

Mutations in the ATM gene may increase the hereditary risk for pancreatic cancer, researchers at the Johns Hopkins University have found. The findings were published in the latest edition of the journal Cancer Discovery Thursday.

Pancreatic cancer is one of the most morbid cancers, with less than five percent of those diagnosed with the disease surviving to five years.

Approximately 10 percent of patients come from families with multiple cases of pancreatic cancer.


Skin microbes affect humans’ attractiveness to mosquitoes

Skin microbes affect humans’ attractiveness to mosquitoesWashington, Dec 29 : Microbes on a person's skin determine how attractive an individual is to mosquitoes, a new study has found.

Without bacteria, human sweat is odourless to the human nose, so the microbial communities on the skin play a key role in producing each individual''s specific body odour.

The researchers, led by Niels Verhulst of Wageningen University in the Netherlands, conducted their experiments with the Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto mosquito, which plays an important role in malaria transmission.


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