28pc of U.S. women have kids by more than one man

Washington, April 2: An American study of the prevalence of multiple partner fertility has found that 28 percent of all U. S. women with two or more children have children by more than one man.

"I was surprised at the prevalence," said demographer Cassandra Dorius, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Michigan Institute for Social Research.

"Multiple partner fertility is an important part of contemporary American family life, and a key component to the net of disadvantage that many poor and uneducated women face every day," he said.

While previous studies have examined how common multiple partner fertility is among younger women, or among women who live in urban areas, the research by Dorius is the first to assess prevalence among a national sample of U. S. women who have completed their child-bearing years.

Dorius analyzed data on nearly 4,000 U. S. women who were interviewed more than 20 times over a period of 27 years, as part of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth.

The data included detail on individual men in each household, capturing what demographers call "relationship churning."

For nonresidential relationships, Dorius triangulated information from mother and child reports to establish common paternity.

She found that having children by different fathers was more common among minority women, with 59 percent of African American mothers, 35 percent of Hispanic mothers and 22 percent of white mothers reporting multiple partner fertility.

Women who were not living with a man when they gave birth and those with low income and less education were also more likely to have children by different men.

But she also found that multiple partner fertility is surprisingly common at all levels of income and education and is frequently tied to marriage and divorce rather than just single parenthood.

The study will be presented April 1 in Washington, D. C., at the annual meeting of the Population Association of America. (ANI)