Environment

Experimental Rocket by Aerojet Rocketdyne Fails during Maiden Flight

Experimental Rocket by Aerojet Rocketdyne Fails during Maiden Flight

The US Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center at Los Angeles Air Force Base announced that an experimental rocket belonging to a new bred of expandable launchers has failed in its maiden flight on Tuesday.

As per officials, the rocket was launched from the Pacific Missile Range Facility in Kauai at 7:45 pm Pacific Standard Time. The 67-foot-long rocket crashed within one minute of its flight.

Marine biologists to conduct necropsy on 800-pound leatherback sea turtle

Marine biologists to conduct necropsy on 800-pound leatherback sea turtle

On Saturday, a leatherback sea turtle weighing 800 pounds was found death off Cape Cod. Now, New England Aquarium biologists are going to perform necropsy on the six-and-a-half foot long turtle to know the reason behind death.

The adult female, which was found around a mile south of Wood's Hole by the Massachusetts Environmental Police, was having a two foot section of marine rope in her mouth. It is considered that the turtle had died two days back.

After spotting the dead turtle, the Massachusetts Environmental Police, towed it to a boat ramp near the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Marine biologists have affirmed that the necropsy would take place on Sunday at the New England Aquarium Sea Turtle Hospital in Quincy.

Beluga Whale dies at Georgia Aquarium

Beluga Whale dies at Georgia Aquarium

In the past three years, three beluga whales have died in the Georgia Aquarium. Among them, two were infants and lately, Maris herself has died. For now, the aquarium could not know the reason behind the death.

In the case of infants, they failed to thrive. On Thursday afternoon, Maris died, but as per the aquarium officials, the 21-year-old beluga whale appeared to be healthy. In fact, she has passed her weakly health exam and no symptom of illness was felt. She was having proper diet.

The death had severely affected the care givers at the aquarium. Visitors who came on Friday morning were not aware of the big loss. Maris was born in 1994 at the New York Aquarium. In 2005, she came to the Georgia Aquarium.

Researchers discover a type of deep-sea bacteria that can neutralize high quantities of carbon dioxide in atmosphere

Researchers discover a type of deep-sea bacteria that can neutralize high

The University of Florida researchers have found a type of deep-sea bacteria that can neutralize large quantities of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. In a statement released by the University of Florida, researchers have said that the bacterium called Thiomicrospira crunogena yields an enzyme carbonic anhydrase that is helpful in removing carbon dioxide from organisms.

As per the Environmental Protection Agency, carbon dioxide is main greenhouse gas that is emitted as a result of human activities. Carbonic anhydrase can work to break down the carbon dioxide only in extreme temperatures and pressures.

Five Islands loses its exquisite landmark ‘The Eye’

Five Islands loses its exquisite landmark ‘The Eye’

‘The Eye’ was exquisite landmark of Five Islands, Nova Scotia. No one knows the exact age of the rock formation that drew countless tourists to the Fundy shore, but many say that the landmark has been the Bay of Fundy’s major attraction from thousands of years. Now, ‘The Eye’ has vanished.

The landmark is actually Five Islands’ naturally formed arch, which is carved in the basalt and sandstone of Long Island. ‘The Eye’ has attracted tourists from different regions of the globe for many years, but now as its gone, there are chances that the province will see a drop in tourists.

UT Poll shows most of Texans favor local control of Hydraulic Fracturing

UT Poll shows most of Texans favor local control of Hydraulic Fracturing

According to a recent poll conducted by the University of Texas at Austin, a number of Texans think cities should be able to block hydraulic fracturing even if it is permitted by state law.

Earlier this year, Gov. Greg Abbott signed House Bill 40 to control oil and gas drilling. After the bill was passed, Denton became the first town in Texas to block hydraulic fracturing.

An activist who opposed drilling in Flower Mound, Tammy Vajda, said it is crime to take the authority away from cities to do gas drilling within their boundaries.

The poll also revealed that almost half of the respondents, 48%, know what hydraulic fracturing is in comparison to 44% a year ago. Amid that group, 43% are in favor while 41% oppose it.

Sunscreen badly affects coral reefs: Research

Sunscreen badly affects coral reefs

A research paper published in the Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology has unveiled that sunscreen is proving quite harmful for earth's coral reefs, which are already facing threats.

The researchers said the sunscreen has an ingredient known as ozybenzone that has quite a negative effect on coral reef systems. This chemical sucks out the nutrients from coral and in return turns the corals white. The chemical has also been affecting coral's DNA.

To conduct the study, the researchers have focused on the coral reef contamination in the US Virgin Islands of Hawaii. As per the researchers, the tourist spots that attract most visitors are the ones having the highest concentration of oxybenzone.

Michigan DEQ admits critical mistakes were made that lead to contamination of Flint's drinking water

Michigan DEQ admits critical mistakes were made that lead to contamination

The leader of the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality came forward on Monday and admitted that critical mistakes were made that lead to the contamination of Flint's drinking water. On Sunday, Dan Wyant, DEQ Director, accepted the mistakes made by the state in handling the situation and said that ‘necessary changes’ are in process.

Flint has been connected again to Detroit's water system with a hope to resolve a health emergency that had occurred due to the switching of water source of the city from Detroit's water system to Flint River.

Amphibians using toxins to protect themselves at higher risk of extinction

Amphibians using toxins to protect themselves at higher risk of extinction

A new research has unveiled that amphibians that use toxins to protect themselves from predators are at increased risk of extinction in comparison to those amphibians that choose other modes of defense.

Study’s lead researcher Kevin Arbuckle University of Liverpool in England was of the view there could be many reasons owing to which amphibians using chemical defense face increased risk of extinction. Different mechanisms are used by animals including chemical defence including poisons or irritants, camouflage, warning coloration and mimicry.

For example, it could be that there is trade off which leaves prey vulnerable to other kinds of enemies, such as infectious diseases, but we do not yet understand what drives the relationship”, said Arbuckle.

AOA calls on Member Countries to agree on Southern Ocean protection

AOA calls on Member Countries to agree on Southern Ocean protection

During an international meeting on October 18, the Antarctic Ocean Alliance (AOA), which is governed by a steering committee of partners, called on more than two dozen member countries to agree on Southern Ocean protection. The member countries attended the annual meeting of the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) on Monday.

Previously, CCAMLR had announced to create at least two marine protected areas by 2012, but the pledge did not reach agreement due to lack of consensus. In the past, two proposals were failed in last four occasions.

Flint reconnects to Detroit’s water system to resolve health issues

Flint reconnects to Detroit’s water system to resolve health issues

A health emergency occurred in Flint by switching the city's water source from Detroit’s water system to Flint River. The switch was made to save money, but it left children with increased lead levels. Now, Flint has reconnected to Detroit’s water system anticipating of resolving the health issues.

The city said Detroit water would run into the system with a complete replacement and this will happen in about three weeks.

“The money from the state to begin fixing Flint water by reconnecting to Detroit is just a start — a down payment. I am not going to stop until every drop of drinking water in Flint is 100 percent safe”, Flint Mayor Dayne Walling said in a statement.

Millions of American lives will be affected if Carbon Emissions continue Unchecked: Report

Millions of American lives will be affected if Carbon Emissions continue Uncheck

Many studies have already mentioned that seas around the world are rising rapidly due to global warming. If carbon dioxide emissions around the world remain unchecked, rising sea levels will affect millions of lives in America, a new report revealed.

The report led by Benjamin Strauss, researcher from Climate Central in Princeton, and co-authored by Climate Central's Scott Kulp and Anders Levermann of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research in Germany has been published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The researchers of the report said that carbon dioxide emissions in near future will decide which areas will be affected by rising sea levels, and which places are safe to occupy.

New Jersey judge rejects latest bid to block a $225 million Exxon pollution settlement

New Jersey judge rejects latest bid to block a $225 million Exxon pollution sett

A New Jersey judge has ordered that environmental groups couldn't interfere in the state's $225 million settlement with Exxon Mobil over contaminated gas stations and other sites. However, the groups have promised to keep fighting.

WCBS 880's Kelly Waldron has reported that Superior Court Judge Michael Hogan has ordered that state Sen. Raymond Lesniak (D-Union/Elizabeth) and the four groups do not have permission to bring the lawsuit. This is for the second time that Hogan has denied their petition.

Jeff Tittel of the New Jersey Sierra Club said, "All it means is the next move is up to us, and we are going to be appealing the judge's ruling. We believe that this is bad for the environment; bad for the taxpayers of New Jersey".

New Zealand to have new environmental sanctuary

New Zealand to have new environmental sanctuary

New Zealand Prime Minister John Key has announced that a new environmental sanctuary will be made, which will be one of the world’s largest ocean sanctuaries. Key made the announcement while he was in New York for the United Nations General Assembly.

The sanctuary is estimated to be almost the size of France. The massive-sized sanctuary will be made in the South Pacific Ocean. The Kermadec Ocean Sanctuary will cover 62,000 square kilometers area. It will be 50 times bigger than New Zealand’s current biggest national park in Fiordland.

Global Warming and Stronger El Niño to affect Sea Levels in Future

Global Warming and Stronger El Niño to affect Sea Levels in Future

A number of studies have already warned that global warming is going to make life difficult on earth. Now, oceanographers have predicted that the planet is going to experience stronger El Niño events in near future, and these events will affect sea levels strongly.

Axel Timmermann, an oceanographer at the University of Hawaii, said it is like climate change on steroids. An El Niño event can result into changes in patterns of wind and changes in ocean currents. These changes lead to redistribution of warm water and drop in sea levels.

According to climate researchers, as temperatures around the world are rising rapidly, there are high chances that El Niño events will be common in future. These events will force sea levels to swing from one extreme to the other, they added.

New York Could Face Severe Hurricane Sandy Flooding

New York Could Face Severe Hurricane Sandy Flooding

According to a new research carried out by researchers at Pennsylvania State University, melting of ice caps triggered by climate change is not just the only thing that could put New York City underwater. The new study showed that the city could face a repeat of hurricane Sandy flooding.

Researchers said a storm surge like the one similar to that of 2012 that made its way through the barricades, swamping roadways and flooding subway tunnels, could happen again.

Andra Reed, study author and graduate student in meteorology at Penn State in a university release said that in the pre-anthropogenic era, the return period for a storm producing a surge of 2.81 meters or higher like sandy at the Battery would have been about 3,000 years.

Alice is now darling of visitors to Chicago Botanic Garden in Glencoe

Alice is now darling of visitors to Chicago Botanic Garden in Glencoe

Alice is the new darling of visitors to Glencoe's Chicago Botanic Gardens. Alice is a titan arum, a corpse flower, a rare plant that belongs to the rain forests of Sumatra Indonesia. Late Monday night, Alice started blooming. It is currently stinking up the Garden's Semitropical Greenhouse.

Horticulturist Tim Pollak said it has been a long night and that he went there around 3 in the morning. He mentioned that they noticed Alice was beginning to open at 11 during night.

Botanic Garden workers pollinated Alice on Tuesday morning with the help of pollen from a titan arum that bloomed in August in Denver and also from Spike.

El Niño-La Niña cycles to get worse with global warming

El Niño-La Niña cycles to get worse with global warming

A new study published on Friday in the Journal Science Advances has suggested that global warming is likely to become double in frequency in this century. As a result, El Niño-La Niña cycles will also become stronger and more common.

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), El Niño and La Niña are complex weather patterns that emerge as a result of variations in ocean temperatures in the Pacific. Both of them are opposite phases of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) cycle describing the fluctuation in temperature between the ocean and the atmosphere.

Climate Change to Increase Cost of $43 Trillion By 2200

Climate Change to Increase Cost of $43 Trillion By 2200

The findings of a new study have warned that if the world’s permafrost layer melts down, the situation could result in an addition of over $43 trillion to the already massive climate-related debt faced by humanity.

As per estimations, the gross domestic product of the United States was nearly $17.5 trillion in 2014. But the study has shown that the cost of climate change in the next two centuries will be more than two-and-a-half times of America's GDP.

Kevin Schaefer, a research scientist at the National Snow and Ice Data Center and one of the authors of the report, said that the melting of the permafrost will cost an “economic death sentence”, which will be beyond imagination.

Nearly 8 Trillion plastic microbeads polluting water every day in United States: Research

About 8 trillion Plastic Microbeads enter US Water Bodies Every Day

A research team lead by Oregon State University has estimated that nearly 8 trillion plastic ‘microbeads’ are entering the water bodies in the United States, every day. The increasing use of microbeads in many personal care and beauty products could have a major impact on our environment. Microbeads are tiny particles which offer abrasive function and are used in many products including face washes and toothpastes.




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