Environment

UN Scientific Report warns Shrinking Pollinator Population may affect Global Food Security

UN Scientific Report warns Shrinking Pollinator Population

In an alarming new scientific report, the United Nations has hinted that the world's food supply is in danger as many pollinator species are at the verge of extinction. If nothing is done to save them, the world will have to suffer a loss of hundreds of billions in food crops.

More than 70% of food supply around the world is dependent on pollinators such as bees, butterflies and many others. Until now, decline in pollinator population, or their heath was part of regional based studies, but an organization of the United Nations released a global report this week which underlined pollinators’ importance to the whole world.

MIT Analysis confirms Belief That Earth's First Critter was Sea Sponge

MIT Analysis confirms Belief That Earth's First Critter was Sea Sponge

Sea sponge, a creature believed to be the first creature to inhabit the planet, has now some facts to support the notion. An analysis on 640-million-year-old rocks by researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) found a molecule from a simple sea sponge.

The new research has confirmed that the critter arrived on earth at a time much before than many other animals and the Cambrian Explosion. The belief that the sea sponge was the earth’s first creature is not new, and the new analysis has verified the notion by studying ancient molecular fossils.

Global Warming ‘Hiatus’ is Back, New Study says Warming Paused during Early 2000s

Global Warming ‘Hiatus’ is Back, New Study says Warming Paused during Early 2000

Undoubtedly, the impact of global warming has been felt in the recent years and it has been well documented by environment advocates. Global warming could lead to catastrophic consequences if not controlled by reducing greenhouse gases and pollution. Some environmental experts think earth is warming today, but during the early 2000s, global warming paused.

This is not the first time when global warming ‘hiatus’ has given rise to a debate over climate change. Last year, the debate was flared up when the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) announced that it didn’t find any evidence proving that global warming has slowed down since the early-2000s. That time, doubters accused the federal agency of hiding the truth on climate change.

Top scientists defend the idea of Global Warming Hiatus

Top scientists defend the idea of Global Warming Hiatus

The UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change said in a definitive 2013 report that there had been an actual slowdown of global warming during the last 15 years. The report noted that the warming rate during the period from 1998 through 2012 was less than the rate noted since 1951, but the body has also warned that because of natural unpredictability, trends based on short records were quite sensitive to the starting and end dates and generally don’t reflect long-term climate trends.

The thought about a global warming slowdown or ‘pause’ was continually cited by climate change skeptics and deniers after 2013 but the notion has been challenged by some of the recent scientific reports.

Vast communities of migrating deep-sea marine life are culprits behind mystery ocean hum

Vast communities of migrating deep-sea marine life are culprits behind mystery

Huge communities of migrating deep-sea marine life are to be blamed for a baffling, low-frequency humming sound that comes from the ocean when the creatures swim to and from the surface during feeding.

The University of California, San Diego assistant research biologist Simone Baumann-Pickering, has made a discovery, answering a long-standing query. NPR reported that the source of the hum has vexed marine biologists for years. They were very well aware that the sound wasn't constant with whale calls or other marine mammals, like dolphins, communicating.

Reducing Carbon Emission could Prevent Thousands of Deaths in US By 2030

Reducing Carbon Emission could Prevent Thousands of Deaths in US By 2030

In 2013, CO2 accounted for more than 80% of all US greenhouse gas emissions due to human activity, according to United States environment protection agency (EPA). Air pollution is associated with high number of deaths from respiratory complications. Cutting down carbon emissions will not only favor our environment, but also health of masses.

EPA stated that carbon dioxide is the primary greenhouse gas emitted through human activity. A new study was conducted by researchers at Duke University and the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies to investigate impacts of polluted air on mortality rate. The findings of the study were published in Nature Climate Change on Monday.

New Study explains how Drought-like Conditions are affecting all US Forests

New Study explains how Drought-like Conditions are affecting all US Forests

Not just California, but all forests in the United States are at risk of facing catastrophic effects of climate change, a new study published in journal Global Change Biology has predicted. Change in weather pattern is happening rapidly, and forests don’t have time to react, as per the study.

Researchers from over one dozen institutions said that rising instances of drought-like conditions, which were previously found affecting only Western forests, have now started impacting nearly all forests and cities across the country. Climate models created by ecologists and researchers are suggesting that drought may become more severe and prolonged in most of the states in the US.

Sea levels on Earth are rising due to human activity led global warming: Studies

Sea levels on Earth are rising due to human activity led global warming: Studies

New studies suggest that sea levels on Earth have been rising at a much faster speed than they have in the last about 2,800 years. According to the studies conducted in the past, the acceleration is due to global warming caused due to human activity and not only natural phenomenon.

An international group of scientists dug into two dozen sites globally to note down the rising and falling seas over a long period.

The fastest sea level rise was nearly 1 to 1.5 inches in 100 years, until the 1880s and the world’s industrialization. At that time, global sea level didn’t become much higher or lower than 3 inches above or below the 2,000-year average.

Highly Contaminated Air May Lead to Obesity and Diabetes

Highly Contaminated Air May Lead to Obesity and Diabetes

Obesity and diabetes are among most common diseases around the world and studies and experiments so far have come up with various causes linked to both. One such study conducted recently in Beijing blamed polluted air for causing metabolic dysfunctional in rats that in return caused obesity in them. The research was conducted by scientists at Duke University. The finding of the study was published in the FASEB Journal.

Oceans Rising Faster than They Rose in Past 2,800 Years, Study blames Global Warming

Oceans Rising Faster than They Rose in Past 2,800 Years, Study blames Global

Rise in ocean levels is not a new phenomenon as several studies have already highlighted that the ocean levels around the globe are rising. But a new study revealed that the speed of rise has broken thousands of years old record.

Rise in sea levels was 14 centimeters, or 5.5 inches, from 1900 to 2000, which means 1.4 millimeters every year, the study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences stated. As per NASA figures, the present rate of rise is around 3.4 millimeters a year, which shows that sea levels are accelerating at a fast rate.

Beijing to Raise ‘red alert’ Pollution Threshold for Air Pollution

Beijing to Raise ‘red alert’ Pollution Threshold for Air Pollution

To tackle air pollution, China announced to issue ‘red alert’ threshold in capital city Beijing. In December last year, the Chinese capital had its first red alert for air pollution. Smog hovering over the city led to school and business closures that time.

The latest move by the Chinese government has hinted that heavy fines and some other actions didn’t provide the desired results to solve the Beijing's air pollution problem. As per the city’s current air quality index (AQI) rules, a red alert can be issued when the AQI is 200 or more for minimum 72 hours. The AQI rules of Tianjin and Hebei stipulate that red alert should be issued when the AQI exceeds 500 for at least 24 hours.

Madagascar Forest Clearance was Manmade Instead of Nature-Driven

Madagascar Forest Clearance was Manmade Instead of Nature-Driven

Madagascar has dry, deciduous forests where clearance is an ongoing process. It is designated Global 200 ecoregion, one of the world’s most crucial regions for conservation by World Wide Fund for Nature. New research to find the exact reason behind forest loss in Madagascar for around 1,000 years points towards human intervention and activity.

A team of scientists from both UMass Amherst and MIT defies the belief of many theories offered in the past. They state that manmade factors led to the forest disaster instead of natural issues. To come to their conclusion, they studied a pair of stalagmites sourced from a cave in the northwest corner of the island.

Michigan Department of Natural Resources Announces Deadline for Ice Shanty Removal

Michigan Department of Natural Resources Announces Deadline for Ice Shanty

Deadline for the removal of ice fishing shanties has been issued by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (DNR). The Agency has asked anglers to move remaining shanties on Lake St. Clair as mandatory ice shanty removal dates are approaching.

As per an announcement by the DNR, the temperature is increasing and it is becoming very difficult for the ice to hold shanties, so anglers are requested to remove shanties as soon as possible. The deadline by the agency shows that people have about 24 days to remove ice shanties from the Michigan-Wisconsin boundary waters. The Upper Peninsula counties will have extra half month to remove shanties. All counties in the area must remove shanties by March 31, the DNR announced.

Map Developed to Highlight Climate Change Hot Spots

Map Developed to Highlight Climate Change Hot Spots

Climate change is going to affect almost every region on our planet and urgent steps are required to deal with it. Over time, some of the places will get hotter, some cloudier, some drier and some wetter. A new map has been developed by using 14 years of data that shows which areas of the earth are going to affect the most due to climate change.

The map featured in the journal Nature has been developed using new system that analyzes satellite data. It represents what researchers call a vegetation sensitivity index (VSI), a method that combines many data sources. The first set of data used for the new map was taken from the enhanced vegetation index.

ASA supports efforts made on federal and state levels to address Florida's water quality issues

ASA supports efforts made on federal and state levels to address Florida's water

The American Sportfishing Association (ASA) has come in support of initiatives being taken on the federal and state levels to deal with the water quality issues in Florida that can affect fisheries habitat and management.

A record-breaking amount of rainfall in January needed the release of a huge amount of water from Lake Okeechobee by the US Army Corps of Engineers, sending fresh water both west and east to coastal regions, severely impacted by such a move.

The US Army Corps of Engineers on Monday, February 15, took an action on an emergency request made by the Governor's office, along with other state agencies, to let the water go to south on its notable path via Everglades National Park into Florida Bay.

Florida Atlantic University Professor Explains Presence of 10,000 Sharks in State’s Water

Florida Atlantic University Professor Explains Presence of 10,000 Sharks

Every year, during shark season, Professor Stephen M. Kajiura of Florida Atlantic University receives reports that thousands of sharks are moving near the shores. December to April is a time when sharks migrate from cold water in search of food, said Kajiura.

Kajiura said he surveys the Florida beaches every year from December to April to see herd of sharks travelling near the beaches. Last week, professor Kajiura saw thousands of blacktip sharks when he was flying over a beach in his plane. He captured a video and posted it on the Internet. Since then, the footage has gone viral on the social media.

Depletion of Ice Sheet is Not a Major Concern for Now, Believe Researchers

Depletion of Ice Sheet is Not a Major Concern for Now, Believe Researchers

Climate scientists worldwide are highly concerned about the current level of decline in the ice sheets. The manner in which these ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctic are turning into stream is thought to cause less serious climate concerns, claimed a new study published on Wednesday in the journal Nature.

To conduct the study aimed at understanding the nature of ice stream in regions of Greenland and Antarctic, researchers examined 117 ice streams that appeared throughout the ancient Laurentide Ice Sheet, which melted during a period from around 22,000 to 7,000 years ago. These ice streams were frozen once covering millions of square miles throughout most of the northern region of North America, an area proportionate to area presently occupied by Antarctica.

Researchers find 736 genetic variations in hatchery-grown and wild salmons

Researchers find 736 genetic variations in hatchery-grown and wild salmons

Wild salmons are quite different from their counterparts raised in hatcheries on farms, having as many as 736 genetic variations. Researchers at Oregon State University in collaboration with the Oregon Department of Fisheries and Wildlife conducted a study to throw light on these differences, which have long been theorized to exist.

During the study, published Wednesday in Nature Communications, the researchers found DNA evidence to corroborate their claim as they compared the offspring of first-generation salmon raised in a hatchery with those in the wild.

Scientists use satellites to map areas most sensitive to climate variability on global scale

Scientists use satellites to map areas most sensitive to climate variability on

Different regions across the world are more and less sensitive to climate change. Now, scientists have used satellites for mapping which regions are most sensitive to climate change on a global scale.

In a news release, Alistair Seddon, one of the researchers, said that based on the collected satellite data, they can identify areas that in the last 14 years have shown high sensitivity to climate change.

The researchers have come to know about the climate drivers of vegetation productivity on monthly timescales, in the new study. This has specifically revealed the climate ecosystem among many ecosystems worldwide.

Domestic Salmon’s DNA widely different from Wild Salmon

Domestic Salmon’s DNA widely different from Wild Salmon

The salmon fish grown in fish farms are believed to have more contamination and unhealthy fats than those growing in wild. Almost 70% of the salmon fish sold are grown in farms. This poses serious danger to the wild salmon as if it will come in the contact of contaminants releasing from farmed fish, the diseases could contribute in suppressing wild salmon species.

The problem is more concerning in British Columbia where many of the fish farms are located in the sea and are contained within the open nets, which makes the spread of the disease more feasible. The solution for reproducing more wild salmon can be achieved through salmon born in hatcheries.




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