Environment

Key North American glaciers rapidly shrinking due to climate change

Key North American glaciers rapidly shrinking due to climate changeWashington, September 1 : A long-term study of key glaciers in western North America has shown that glacial shrinkage is rapid and accelerating, and that it is a result of climate change.

William Shilts, a geologist at the University of Illinois, spent nearly two decades studying glaciers on Bylot Island, an uninhabited island about 300 miles southwest of Thule, Greenland.

Working with his students and other geologists, he has chronicled the decline of several Bylot Island glaciers.

Climate change could deepen poverty in developing countries

Climate change could deepen poverty in developing countriesWashington, August 20 : A new study has determined that climate change could deepen poverty in developing countries.

In the study, a team led by Purdue University researchers examined the potential economic influence of adverse climate events, such as heat waves, drought and heavy rains, on those in 16 developing countries.

Urban workers in Bangladesh, Mexico and Zambia were found to be the most at risk, as the cost of food drives them into poverty.

Shark nets and pollution take their toll on white dolphins

Shark nets and pollution take their toll on white dolphins Hong Kong  - Shark nets and pollution have been blamed for the death of 16 white dolphins that have been spotted in and around Hong Kong so far this year, a media report said Thursday.

Experts said the number of dead dolphins is the highest ever recorded, but they also think the true death toll could be higher, the South China Morning Post newspaper said.

Five of the dolphins, which were all found between January and July, were discovered in Hong Kong waters, while three were located off Macau and eight in the Pearl River close to Hong Kong.

Report: NZ marine areas second-equal with Alaska as the world’s healthiest

Report: NZ marine areas second-equal with Alaska as the world’s healthiest A report which describes New Zealand marine areas as second equal with Alaska as the healthiest in the world has been welcomed by Fisheries Minister Phil Heatley.

Recently published in the Science journal, the report - an international scientific research paper titled 'Rebuilding Global Fisheries' - examined 31 marine areas, mainly in the United States, Canada, Australia, Europe and New Zealand.

Circulating fluidized bed technology generates power while reducing emissions

Circulating fluidized bed technology generates power while reducing emissionsWashington, July 19 : Reports indicate that the Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) technology uses burning coal and biomass to generate power while reducing emissions at the same time.

The CFB technology uses fluidization to mix and circulate fuel particles with limestone as they burn in a low-temperature combustion process.

Unlike conventional steam generators that burn the fuel in a massive high-temperature flame, CFB technology does not have burners or a flame within its furnace.

Thread-like fungi may help high elevation pines grow

Washington, July 19 : A professor from Montana State University is searching for ways to use thread-like fungi, which grows in soils at high elevations, for restoring whitebark and limber pine forests in Canada.

Cathy Cripps, who is working with resource managers and visitor relations staff from Waterton Lakes National Park (WLNP), is part of a project that aims to restore fire to the national park, reduce the impact of noxious weeds and restore disturbed sites to native vegetation, including whitebark and limber pine.

The pines have declined from 40 to 60 percent across their range, and when the trees die, the fungi associated with them also die.

Thread-like fungi may help high elevation pines grow

Washington, July 19 : A professor from Montana State University is searching for ways to use thread-like fungi, which grows in soils at high elevations, for restoring whitebark and limber pine forests in Canada.

Cathy Cripps, who is working with resource managers and visitor relations staff from Waterton Lakes National Park (WLNP), is part of a project that aims to restore fire to the national park, reduce the impact of noxious weeds and restore disturbed sites to native vegetation, including whitebark and limber pine.

The pines have declined from 40 to 60 percent across their range, and when the trees die, the fungi associated with them also die.




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