Environment

Carbon Dioxide is believed to have influenced Ice Sheet from beginning

Carbon Dioxide is believed to have influenced Ice Sheet from beginning

Scientists are increasingly linking Antarctic ice sheet to the level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Supporting the idea, a new research published in the Journal Science claimed that during the time when ice sheet first started appearing, a fall in CO2 in atmosphere may have let ice sheet to form.

According to the research, the period known as the Eocene-Oligocene boundary, which prevailed some 34 million years ago, is believed to have been an era that led to periods of glaciations. The research has found that falling level of carbon dioxide back then has initiated ice sheet growth.

Advanced Climate Science allows accurate detection of Global Warming Fingerprints

Advanced Climate Science allows accurate detection of Global Warming Fingerprint

As per a high-level scientific advisory panel, climate science has advanced considerably in the recent years and climate science experts can correctly sense the fingerprints of global warming on some particular severe weather events, including a heat wave.

For long, scientists have been giving the same response to the question if an event of weird weather was caused by global warming. They have always insisted that they can’t call a single event accountable for climate change.

However, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine reported that Science has progressed to the point that this isn’t true as an unqualified blanket statement anymore.

Greenhouse gas concentration likely played a role in setting all of last 16 yearly global temperature records

Greenhouse gas concentration likely played a role in setting all of last 16 year

In a new research paper on climate and impact of greenhouse gases, scientists have informed that global temperatures in 1937 were record-breaking for that time. Two years later, the heat record was broken again, and more records were set in 1940, 1941 and 1944.

It is for the first time ever that climate scientists have got to know the role of greenhouse gas pollution in global temperatures measured at the time of record-breaking years back to 1937, when industrialized cities and nations kept on burning coal to provide power to trains and factories.

Daniel Mitchell, an Oxford University physicist, who has been closely monitoring climate change, said what they have got to know was that they may actually find out human influence on worst events much earlier than they’d thought.

Level of atmospheric carbon dioxide increased at a record pace in 2015, says NOAA

Level of atmospheric carbon dioxide increased at a record pace in 2015, says NOA

The latest data reported by NOAA has revealed that last year the level of atmospheric carbon dioxide has increased in the most since the recordkeeping started. Level of carbon dioxide increased in 2015 and it could be blamed partially on El Nino. As per the study by researchers at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), for the last four years, the level of CO2 in atmosphere has increased by at least 2 million part per million, each year.

Climate change sealed fate of ichthyosaurs that ruled oceans for 157 million years

Climate change sealed fate of ichthyosaurs that ruled oceans for 157 million yea

Climate change is behind wiping out ichthyosaurs, marine reptiles that were the rulers of the oceans for 157 million years, as suggested by a study of fossils.

Some 30 million years back, the dolphin-like animal died prior to the mass dinosaur extinction towards the end of the Cretaceous period, 66 million years back.

Vertebrate paleontologist Dr. Valentin Fischer, who headed the research, said that the extinction of ichthyosaurs, which were quite familiar to oceanic life, has been a long-standing enigma. The research has recently appeared in journal Nature Communications.

Humpback whale found dead on Silver Strand Beach, NOAA to find cause of death

Climate change: Sub-Saharan Africa’s food supply in danger, study seeks agricult

A 23-foot-long dead humpback whale was found dead on Silver Strand State Beach in Coronado. The whale washed ashore at the beach on Tuesday morning at around 10 am, as per officials of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

The one-year-old mammal, weighing over 2,000 pounds, was first spotted by the Coast Guard four days back about 9 miles offshore in Point Loma. The NOAA team reached the scene and inspected the dead whale. It’s a freshly dead whale, said the NOAA team.

Shipwrecks are new Markers to estimate date for Hurricanes from past

World’s blackest material Vantablack Might Have Become Even Darker, says creator

Till now, researchers relied on the coastal lake sediments or coral isotopes to date hurricanes which took place in past, but now shipwrecks are also seen as evidence of hurricane activities. The researchers at Arizona State University examined data from 657 shipwrecks. They compared the data collected with tree ring data to give precise date to hurricanes. The study results have been published in the journal PNAS.

“We found that in the years when many ships wrecked in the Caribbean, the trees in the Florida Keys showed the same signal that trees show during hurricanes. So, that gave an indication that we could use shipwreck records as a proxy for hurricane activity”, said Jason Thomson, author of the new paper.

Many food crops at risk in Africa and immediate attention is required: Study

Many food crops at risk in Africa and immediate attention is required: Study

Many African staple food crops are at risk due to climate change, and there is an urgent need for strict actions to help farmers become accustomed to changing weather patterns, revealed a new study. With changing climate, farmers in many regions across Africa will have to adapt with the change. Unless the farming community receives helps from government and local authorities, food scarcity could lead to catastrophic outcomes, mainly due to changing weather patterns in Africa.

Researchers warned that if we fail to tackle the problem now, it will be very difficult to grow some food crops in sub-Saharan Africa in near future. Climate change is threatening the region’s nine crops, including beans, maize and bananas, as per the study.

First operational dive of Okeanos Explorer’s 2016 season may have accidently discovered new octopod

First operational dive of Okeanos Explorer’s 2016 season may have accidently

This year’s first operational dive of Okeanos Explorer has come across the discovery of a new octopod. This is what the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration scientists believe.

During the first dive of the 2016 season on February 27, it explored depths of more than 4,000 meters northeast of Necker Island in the Hawaiian Archipelago.

The motive behind the dive was the collection of baseline information and a probable link between Necker Island and Necker Ridge. It was to collect samples to find out if they possess the same composition. However, during the dive, ROV Deep Discoverer also examined biological communities.

Researchers find surprising way of investigating relationship between hurricanes and climate change

Researchers find surprising way of investigating relationship between hurricanes

A latest research has found an innovative way of investigating the link between hurricanes and climate change by analyzing the history of the Caribbean Sea’s Spanish shipwrecks at the time of a planetary cooling period by the end of the 17th and 18th century.

Based on the comparisons between the Florida Keys’ tree rings and shipwrecks historical records, the research has concluded that there were quite less hurricanes, or tropical cyclones, during the time period of 1645 through 1715 when Earth experienced what is known as the ‘Maunder Minimum’.

It was the time when very less sunspot activity was connected with comparatively cooler temperatures on the planet. The Maunder Minimum belongs to a cooler period known as the ‘Little Ice Age’ in the history of our planet.

NASA Blames Severe Drought for issues in the Middle East

NASA Blames Severe Drought for issues in the Middle East

NASA has blamed severe drought, which can be termed as the worst in last 900 years, for causing the extremely complicated disorders in the Middle East and disruptions of Syria and Iraq. According to a research conducted by NASA, the eastern Mediterranean Levant region, consisting Cyprus, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Palestine, Syria and Turkey, has been under severe drought conditions since 1998.

Deepest part of the ocean is full of noises

Deepest part of the ocean is full of noises

The bottom of the ocean isn’t as quiet as it seems. Researchers were surprised when they heard noise on dropping a microphone into the Mariana Trench 6 miles down in the Pacific Ocean.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Oregon State University scientists, who were behind the experiment, didn’t expect strange sounds recorded by their equipment. According to a release by Oregon State University, the scientists didn’t hear silence, but sounds of earthquakes, ships, the far away moans of baleen whales and the overwhelming screams of a category 4 typhoon that had crossed overhead.

Omura whale study off the coast of Madagascar is resounding success, New England Aquarium announces

Omura whale study off the coast of Madagascar is resounding success, New England

On Thursday, the New England Aquarium declared that its Omura whale research off the coast of Madagascar was highly successful. The study on the rare tropical whale was led by Dr. Salvatore Cerchio. Last fall, Cerchio’s team claimed 80 sightings whereas before their expedition, just 44 sightings as a whole had been made since the discovery of the whale.

In 2003, the Omura’s whale was recognized just as a unique species. Since long, the tropical Omura’s whale has been mistakenly taken to be pygmy Bryde’s whales. The rare tropical whale study by Dr. Salvatore Cerchio and his fellow researchers was a first on the elusive species.

Scientists at Postojna Cave in Slovenia await hatching of country’s rare ‘baby dragons’

Scientists at Postojna Cave in Slovenia await hatching of country’s rare ‘baby'

Fans of ‘Game of Thrones’ are going to have a field day this week, as scientists at the Postojna Cave in Slovenia are waiting for the hatching of the nations’ rare ‘baby dragons’.

The 55 eggs that triggered commotion this week belong to the only cave-adapted vertebrate species in Europe, known as the olm. The olm is found mainly in Eastern European countries, Slovenia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and Croatia. The olm is a blind cousin of North America's well-known salamander.

The olm can lead a perfect life underground. Adult olms retain characteristics from their larval stage, including gills and absence of eyelids, and super sensitive hearing and the capability to hunt by finding out electric fields.

Increasingly sophisticated technologies opening windows into mysterious world of wild animals

Increasingly sophisticated technologies opening windows into mysterious world of

Fast-changing technologies have made it possible for scientists to have a look of the baffling world of wild animals. The sophisticated technologies have let humans reach into ocean depths, and climbing to the heights of the tallest mountains for following animals as they feed, communicate or migrate.

California condors have solar-powered trackers fixed on its wings, which have allowed scientists to track their soaring flights to 15,000 feet, whereas track attached to humpback whales have shed light on the 1,000-foot dives made by mammals to underwater mountains. Moreover, the GPS collars on Yellowstone grizzly bears have provided new insights regarding their feeding habits and wellbeing.

Animals have Started to Migrate to Poles due to Rise in Global Temperature: Study

Animals have Started to Migrate to Poles due to Rise in Global Temperature

As temperature in many regions across the world is rising, more animals are marching gradually towards North Pole and South Pole in search of cold environment. Professor Camille Parmesan from Plymouth University in the UK calls present migration as faster than earlier predicted by scientists. It was announced during a conference that was hosted jointly by the University of Tasmania and the Institute for Marine and Antarctica Studies.

MIT researchers come up with a new way of predicting the onset of rogue waves

MIT researchers come up with a new way of predicting the onset of rogue waves

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) researchers have come up with a new way of predicting the onset of rogue waves, also known as killer waves.

So far, efforts for their prediction were restricted to expensive, inefficient, and time-consuming computer models that were focused on mapping out every single wave in a water body.

Published on February 11, in the Journal of Fluid Mechanics, the latest method is simpler, easier, and faster. Aim of the new method is to give sailors and sea-platform workers a time range of two to three minutes to get ready, prepare, including closing down vital systems.

As sea levels rise, economic loss will increase even faster

As sea levels rise, economic loss will increase even faster

On Monday, scientists said that with the rise in sea levels, putting cities from New York to Shanghai in danger, the economic damage is going to increase even faster.

In a study, scientists wrote that severe floods whipped up by storms will become ever more costly for cities with the ocean levels edging up around the coasts worldwide in coming decades. The study may help guide governments in preparing a budget to save everything, ranging from buildings and basements to metro systems.

While speaking to Reuters, co-author Juergen Kropp, a member of a team at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, said that the findings have shown that the damage from sea level rise increases at a fast pace in comparison to sea level rise itself.

Wildlife ecosystems thriving on fear!

Wildlife ecosystems thriving on fear!

Big carnivores, including tigers, cougars and wolves, instill fear in the prey animals hunted by them. It has turned out that fear is needed for an ecosystem to thrive the way it must.

Published in the journal Nature Communications, a latest study has studied the role played by fear in wildlife ecosystems and discovered that, though it looks unpleasant, it's a must. Wildlife communities have been pushed out of whack because the huge carnivores wanted to implant that fear have been dying like never before.

Growth rates among coral reefs slowing down due to Ocean acidification

Growth rates among coral reefs slowing down due to Ocean acidification

Coral reefs host one-fourth of all marine life, but sadly they have been increasingly facing tough times due to increase in ocean acidification. The calcium-carbonate-based structures are among the latest victims of change in climate and acidification of oceans.

Earlier, researchers discovered that in Australia's Great Barrier Reef, coral growth rates have fallen nearly 40% during the last 30 years.

The reefs are colorful bright marine ecosystems facing many issues due to overfishing, pollution, rising water temperatures and ocean chemistry alteration. For better understanding of how the damage can be reversed, scientists have been putting in efforts to isolate the impact of a stressor in particular, ocean acidification, on coral reefs.




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