Environment

High-rising seas, killer storms are closer than previously thought

High-rising seas, killer storms are closer than previously thought

Extreme climatic calamities like high-rising seas and killer storms could be just decades and not centuries away, a new study into the potential impact of climate change warned.

The study report titled “Ice Melt, Sea Level Rise & Superstorms” warned that the global warming threshold of 2-degree Celsius or 3.6-degree Fahrenheit is too high. The 52-page report was derived from observations of ancient climate change called "paleo-climatology" and observations of current climate shifts, in addition to data from computer modeling.

Former NASA scientist James Hensen, who authored the study, cautioned that humans might have already reached in a position of potentially causing irreparable harm to their future generations.

Beetle Moms zap Fathers with an anti-aphrodisiac and get them to help out with childcare

Beetle Moms zap Fathers with an anti-aphrodisiac and get them to help out with

Scientists have discovered an interesting behavior among beetles as they care for their child and the females do not engage in mating till the time baby beetles are independent. Females also seek help from males in caring for baby beetles.

The research team noted that female burying beetles do not allow males to mate till the time baby beetles are independent. The study has appeared on Tuesday in journal Nature Communications.

Lead researcher Sandra Steiger, an assistant professor of biology at the University of Ulm in Germany, said they are quite a modern family. They studied 400 pairs of beetles during a time period of three years.

Climate Change Not Letting Rocky Mountain Forests Recover After Fire

Climate Change: French wine producers could relocate, or abandon grapes

On Monday, scientists said climate change has moved French wines into unexplored territory, and may push producers to reposition, or abandon the grape varieties that played an important role in giving prominence to their vineyards.

Scientists reported in Nature Climate Change that since 1980, emerging conditions in northern climes like Champagne and Burgundy, and in sun-drenched Bordeaux, have vitally altered the ‘harvest equation’ that represented these regions. French wine is ranked among the highest in the world.

New Study indicates Sea Level Rise is a Bigger Problem than Previously Estimated

New Study indicates Sea Level Rise is a Bigger Problem than Previously Estimated

Humans are being wide off the mark regarding severity of global sea level rise, said a team of researchers in a new study published this week in the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics. The study team informed that the planet could experience much more rise in sea levels than previously estimated, thanks to climate change which is going to worsen in the future. The research team said that 2 degree Celsius target set by climate scientists and policymaker isn’t enough.

Several nations around the globe have pledged to curb greenhouse gas emissions and limit planet’s warming to 2 degrees Celsius by the next century, but these efforts are not sufficient to control sea level rise, suggested the study published in the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics.

French vineyards producing higher quality wine due to climate change

French vineyards producing higher quality wine due to climate change

A number of studies have highlighted the threat of climate change to coastal cities and dry areas around the globe, but a new research suggests that French vineyards are enjoying the earth’s rising temperature. But how?

Dramatic rise in earth’s temperature is having an effect on the way grapes are grown and harvested, as per the study. This affect is altering the taste of French wine and making it even better, it added.

During to the increased global warming, wine manufacturers are harvesting wines roughly two weeks earlier than in the past. In wine industry, early harvesting means good quality wine. The rising temperature may be good news for French wine today, but it will not be able to maintain this wine taste forever, study researchers speculated.

Carbon emissions surpass period of extreme warming 56 million years ago

Carbon emissions surpass period of extreme warming 56 million years ago

Undoubtedly, rate of planet-warming carbon dioxide is increasing at an alarming rate. A study has suggested that today’s carbon-release rate is highest since dinosaur era. In other words, we are releasing carbon into the planet’s oceans and atmosphere faster than in the past many decades.

Today, the release rate of carbon dioxide (CO2) is roughly 10 times faster than an event some 56 million years ago when earth had extreme warming temperature, as per the study published Monday in the journal Nature Geoscience. The new figure should be taken as a warning for how much climate change may affect earth and earthlings in coming times, the study added.

New Alaskan butterfly species may help identify alarming changes in arctic ecosystem

New Alaskan butterfly species may help identify alarming changes in arctic ecosy

Researchers have found a new butterfly species which they believe is the only kind of butterfly endemic to Alaska. The butterfly, called the Tanana arctic, was misidentified for over six decades, as per the researchers.

The butterfly species could be spotted in Tanana-Yukon River Basin region. Researchers think the butterfly could change their opinion on global warming as it responds very quickly to climate change. The new Alaskan butterfly species may help study changes in the arctic ecosystem, said Andrew Warren, a butterfly expert from the University of Florida in Gainesville and an author of a new paper on the discovery.

Dungeness crabs caught off coast of California south of Mendocino-Sonoma County line deemed safe for consumption

Dungeness crabs caught off coast of California south of Mendocino-Sonoma County

On Friday, California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) officials declared that the Dungeness crabs caught off the coast of California south of the Mendocino-Sonoma County line are safe for eating.

The tests conducted on the crabs in the area, recently, showed that domoic acid levels in them don’t pose a risk to human health anymore. The results of the tests encouraged state officials to raise a closure of the recreational Dungeness crab fishery.

According to the CDFW, besides this, a closure of the commercial Dungeness crab fishery in the region will also be lifted on March 26.

In the north of the Mendocino-Sonoma County line, the closure for the Dungeness crab commercial and recreational fisheries is still effective.

New proposal calls for Guantánamo Bay Naval Base to be turned into peace park

New proposal calls for Guantánamo Bay Naval Base to be turned into peace park

As part of a new proposal, Guantánamo Bay Naval Base, which includes the prominent detention center, may get transformed into a marine conservation area and an international peace park. The transformation would be undertaken once the inmates vacate the place.

The proposal has appeared in the journal Science on Thursday. It is considering the fate of the base keeping in mind the recent thaw in Cuba and the United States relations and the impending historic visit of President Obama.

In a telephone interview with The Christian Science Monitor, co-author Joe Roman, a conservation biologist at the University of Vermont said that the US embassy in Cuba is now open, and thus more business and tourists will come, placing more pressure on coastal systems.

Mark Zuckerberg shares his image while running in front of iconic Tiananmen Square in Beijing

Mark Zuckerberg shares his image while running in front of iconic Tiananmen

On Thursday, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, shared a photo of himself running in front of Beijing’s iconic Tiananmen Square. Zuckerberg is in China for a business event.

Facebook CEO wrote that it’s superb to revisit Beijing. He started his visit with a run across the Tiananmen Square, crossing by the Forbidden City, to the Temple of Heaven. Previously in 2016, Zuckerberg promised to run 365 miles this year, and invited people to join him.

Guantánamo Bay Naval Base could be transformed into marine conservation area and international peace park

Guantánamo Bay Naval Base could be transformed into marine conservation area

As part of a new proposal, Guantánamo Bay Naval Base, which includes the well known detention center, could be changed into a marine conservation area and an international peace park, once the inmates vacant it.

Appeared in the journal Science on Thursday, the proposal indicates that the fate of the base could depend on the decision taken by authorities. The relations between Cuba and the United States have improved recently. President Obama’s will soon make a historic visit to Cuba.

In a telephone interview with The Christian Science Monitor, co-author Joe Roman, a conservation biologist at the University of Vermont, said, the US embassy in Cuba is open, with which more business will knock, and tourists will step in, putting more pressure on coastal systems in the coming time.

WHO: 12.6 million people died as a result of living or working in an unhealthy environment in 2012

WHO: 12.6 million people died as a result of living or working in an unhealthy

New estimates by the World Health Organization (WHO) have suggested that an estimated 12.6 million people have lost their lives due to living or working in an unhealthy environment in 2012, roughly 25% of total death cases globally.

There are many environmental risk factors, including air, water and soil pollution, climate change, ultraviolet radiation, and chemical exposures, and all of them reportedly add to over 100 diseases and injuries.

In a press release, WHO Director-General, Dr. Margaret Chan, said that a healthy environment leads to a healthy population. She cautioned that in case nations don’t take actions to make environments healthy, then millions of people will get sick and die at an early age.

Flock of 10 pigeons flying around London to make people more environmentally aware

Flock of 10 pigeons flying around London to make people more environmentally

A flock of 10 pigeons is flying over London with an aim to make city residents aware of air pollution. The flock, dubbed as the Pigeon Air Patrol, is revealing pollution levels throughout London on Twitter.

The idea is to raise awareness among London residents regarding environment. The idea was conceived by DigitasLBi, a global marketing and technology company. Last year, it also won #PoweredByTweets challenge at social network Twitter.

The pigeons selected for the initiative have small backpacks fixed on them to analyze the level of air pollution in an area. Plume Labs, a company headquartered in Paris, designed the lightweight backpacks for the pigeon flock. Sensors in those backpacks measure levels of nitrogen dioxide and ozone in the environment.

Scientists find origin of strange ‘fairy circles’ spotted in Australia

Scientists find origin of strange ‘fairy circles’ spotted in Australia

‘Fairy circles’ have been baffling researchers since a long time. Until now, researchers were trying to understand the scattering and patterns of Africa’s puzzling circles, but now Australia's outback has revealed some of these strange and barren patches.

The mysterious fairy circles were first spotted by scientists at the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ). They noticed the dots on earth’s surface in pictures taken near Newman, Australia. The regularly-patterned circles were similar to barren patches previously spotted in Africa.

The surprising and interesting thing about the dots was that they were spread over a vast area with great regularity, said Stephan Getzin, an expert at the UFZ and lead researcher of the new findings.

Warm ocean water undermining West Antarctica from below may also be weakening its ice shelves: Research

Warm ocean water undermining West Antarctica from below may also be weakening

A couple of years back, two scientific studies mentioned that the West Antarctica glaciers, holding back more than 3 meters of likely sea level rise, have been melting and diminishing from below.

The reason behind the same was apparently that these glaciers are floating on the seafloor deep underneath the ocean surface, and have been lapped at due to the flows of hot ocean currents.

Since then, the main focus of researchers has been more and more on West Antarctica, and now a latest research appeared in Nature Geoscience on Monday has revealed yet another outcome of this warm water intrusion. The latest revelation has further highlighted the areas’ susceptibility.

Even low exposure to pesticides disrupts foraging behavior in bees

Even low exposure to pesticides disrupts foraging behavior in bees

Habitat loss is not the only problem bee populations around the globe is facing. Some diseases and deadly parasites are also behind the dwindling numbers of bees. Now, a new study has revealed that even low pesticide exposure can upset the insect’s foraging behavior.

Exposure to pesticides can push bees to change their flower choices, learning and remembering abilities and skills to collect pollen and nectar, as per the study. During the study, bumblebees exposed to neonicotinoid insecticide took longer time than unaffected bees to collect pollen.

NASA report says February has broken global temperature records by stunning margin

NASA report says February has broken global temperature records by stunning

Global temperatures have been smashing many old records for the past many months, and now a new NASA report adds February 2016 in the list of record-breaker months. According to the report, the shortest month of the year has broken century-old temperature record with a huge margin.

In February, the average surface temperature across the globe was about 1.35 degrees Celsius warmer than the average global surface temperature in February from 1951 to 1980, as per data collected by NASA. The margin was stunning as previous record was set by January 2016 when the average temperature was 1.15 degree Celsius warmer than long-term average for the month.

Rising sea level could affect 13.1 million people by 2100

Rising sea level could affect 13.1 million people by 2100

In the present era of global climate change, steady rise in sea levels and storm surges have become frequent phenomenon, something that has been threatening massive population living in the coastal regions. A team of demographers has forecast that millions of Americans living along the nation’s coasts will be forced to move inland by the end of the century as the climate change worsens.

A study published Monday in the journal Nature Climate Change says that America’s coastal areas, where around 13.1 million people live, could be prone to flooding by 2100. In Bay Area alone, 250,000 people in low-lying parts of San Mateo County would be affected while some 33,000 would be forced to move to San Francisco.

New ‘icephobic’ material removes ice across a variety of surfaces easily

New ‘icephobic’ material removes ice across a variety of surfaces easily

Removing ice across a variety of surfaces could be an easy task in future with an ‘icephobic’ material developed by University of Michigan researchers. The research team claimed that the new material can help in removing ice from wind turbines, airplanes and other surfaces without damaging the surface.

To improve and simplify the process of ice removal, rubbery polymers should be used, said the University of Michigan research team. Use of rubbery polymers is more practical and useful in removing ice, they added.

Environmental groups sue Obama administration over ‘weak’ rules to protect sage grouse

Environmental groups sue Obama administration over ‘weak’ rules to protect sage

Environmental groups have long been demanding strict curbs on activities such as oil and gas drilling that has been blamed for decline in the population of greater sage grouse across the American West.

In a latest effort, these groups Thursday sued the Obama administration alleging the sage grouse conservation programme that the government had announced in September last had many loopholes. Filed in the US District Court in Idaho, the lawsuit also claimed that the plan may not prove enough to protect the bird from extinction. Sage grouse is known for its elaborate mating ritual.




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